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Development Environment

 
Greenhorn
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Hello All,
Not sure if this is the right place to ask this question but I am going to ask here anyways as I didn't find any other place. As a java technology software developer, we are gonna need a variety of software and tools that are open source for free to use. For some of them to use, you have to be able to install in your machine which requires an admin right in the machine. In my previous work places, I/all the developer would have an admin right to their machine to be able to install and configure their development environment however and whenever they want. However, in my current place, developers are not given the admin access to their machine and they have to submit a ticket to network team every time they have to install and configure their environment for example changing from jdk5 to jdk6, installing Apache or tomcat or subversion etc.. Their fear is that if the developers are allowed to do these kind of things, there's a potential to affect the production system which I don't really understand. Now my question is what you all guys do in a situation like this? Do you all have an admin access to your PC? Are you allowed to download software and tools, install and configure in your machine or have network/system admin do it? Isn't that a normal practice in the industry? How's that gonna impact production system?
Any thoughts?

Thanks.
NW
 
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Option #1 - I find a new job. Seriously, hire good engineers and these problems are limited or nonexistent. It stifles the ability to work effectively. I despise companies that do this sort of thing.

Option #2 - Deal with it. Submit your tickets. Work when you can.

What other options are there, really?
 
N Washington
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Gregg Bolinger wrote:

Option #2 - Deal with it. Submit your tickets. Work when you can.


This is what I have been doing.
Since the network/system admin guys don't have any clue as to what one of these open source framework does and how to install and configure them, all they do is log into my machine, watch me do the work till I am done.
And they still don't realize that its not an effective way of doing things.
 
Saloon Keeper
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I've been in a situation where they tried to pull stunts like that. Fortunately, I have the clout to push back. However, one of the less-publicized effects of the perma-temping and H1-B approaches to business is to develop legions of timid little mice who daren't show any initiative lest they lose their jobs and maybe even the ability to stay in this country.

Actually, almost none of the Java open-source developer tools require administrative privileges to install. Most of them can be unzipped and used in the user space, although in some cases you might have side issues (such as possible firewall concerns with Tomcat). The ones that require administrator privileges are typically going to come with an MSI or EXE file, but even a lot of them don't actually require an installer and have unzip-and-go equivalents.

Regardless, if you can't get the support you need to do your job efficiently and effectively, I'd recommend keeping a close lookout for another position (assuming the job market ever recovers). Because, sadly, the world is full of businesses that actually brag about things that they do very poorly.
 
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I agree with Tim--I've almost never had to have admin rights to install Java tools/libraries/etc. It's only been installing things like Windows editors, services, executables, etc. where I've run in to issues.
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