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Coders at work-for a new coder?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 171
Flex Java
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I want to know whether this book helps me code bettter in some way or the other.
I feel persons interviewed must have their own style of making good programs.
Do people like me who are just new to this coding thing get to have knowledge of
some rules regarding how to code better than they presentaly are?
Is their any chance of getting confused knowing all the different ways these great
coders think and work their way to make great softwares.
In short I want to ask that whether this book teach some rules about
making good softwares also?







 
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I suspect you might come away from reading the book with the beginnings of an understanding that there are no rules, at least none that everyone agrees on. I suspect a brand new coder would benefit from reading these interviews but might also want to come back and read them again after getting some experience of their own.
 
Bindu Lakhanpal
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Ok.But maybe a new coder may eventually figure out what works for her after going through the interviews.
I guess,the art of making a good software has many dimentions to look into and knowing about those dimentions will certainly help in some way or other.
 
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Rules or no rules, I can confidently state that one of the most effective things I did to learn to code (and design) better was to read the code from industry leaders. I still have a lot of that stuff.

Back then, what was mostly available was the source for the OS and support utilities. These days, of course, we have so many options that the hard part would be figuring out the best examples. You could spend the rest of your life just on sourceforge alone.

One interesting conclusion that I drew as I went over this stuff is that the best code was produced by the people who were having fun. The grim, "business-oriented" no-nonsense offerings were pretty rotten as a rule. On the other hand even within stodgy old IBM you could find high-quality code liberally accompanied by silly jokes and off-the-wall comments (and this was before Monty Python).
 
Peter Seibel
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I think the interviews in Coders support Tim's observations. Almost all of my interviewees talked about reading code, at least early in their career. (Some of them still do it--Donald Knuth was quite moving on the topic.) And they were all having fun. Though as I mentioned in another answer, that latter bit could be due to selection bias--I wanted to interview fun, interesting people.
 
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