• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

developing Desktop applications

 
vinoth ramanathan
Greenhorn
Posts: 22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
hi,
I hope you all worked with tuneup utilities,Kaspersky etc. Those were desktop applications right. by using what language they are creating that user interface.
Thank you
 
Lorand Komaromi
Ranch Hand
Posts: 276
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
vinoth ramanathan wrote: by using what language they are creating that user interface.


On windows they can be written in just about any language that can call functions in DLLs...
 
Marco Ehrentreich
best scout
Bartender
Posts: 1294
IntelliJ IDE Java Scala
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi vinoth,

I'd say the two big groups of desktop apps in general are native desktop application or applications which need some "environment" like the Java JVM. For Java based applications you could obviously use any programming language or technology which runs on the JVM. For native desktop applications there are lots of technologies ranging from portable toolkits which may be used to create applications for different platforms (Windows vs. Mac OS vs. Linux) or technologies which only support a specific operating system like windows. Qt for example is a framework to create GUI applications which exists on different platforms. Windows specific GUI frameworks like .NET are usually used to create applications which only run on Windows (although there are efforts like the Mono project to run such applications even on Linux for example).

For the said applications I don't know on which technology they are based as I only use Linux. But tools which need access to internals of the OS, like Kaspersky, you usually have to use one of the native technologies. I hope this information was more or less helpful even if I can't tell you the correct answer

Marco
 
Rob Spoor
Sheriff
Posts: 20819
68
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Marco Ehrentreich wrote:Windows specific GUI frameworks like .NET are usually used to create applications which only run on Windows (although there are efforts like the Mono project to run such applications even on Linux for example).

.NET is not a GUI framework. Instead of being like Swing, it's more like JSE. I believe the default GUI toolkit for Windows is MVC, and that is also used in .NET.
 
Marco Ehrentreich
best scout
Bartender
Posts: 1294
IntelliJ IDE Java Scala
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Sorry for being imprecise! Of course you're right, .NET is more than a simple GUI toolkit but instead a whole application platform. Unfortunately I don't know any details about the GUI part of it as don't write native applications for Windows and I don't even use Windows.

Marco
 
Rob Spoor
Sheriff
Posts: 20819
68
Chrome Eclipse IDE Java Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
You had the right idea though - there is not one single toolkit. Even for Windows you can use many tools and toolkits. GTK+ and Qt are both available for Windows, as is of course MVC. The latter is most used though because most development tools (Visual Studio, Borland's GUI builders, etc) use it.
For Linux there are bound to be even more toolkits; GTK+, Qt and of course even raw X11 coding are quite often used.

That said, even having selected one toolkit, it is possible to write code in many languages. C and C++ are preferred with most toolkits, but Borland allows you to use Delphi, and there are even bindings for Python, Perl and Java for most toolkits. I think that the most restrictive toolkit is MVC but even that gives you the choice of at least C, C++, Visual Basic and C# (the latter using .NET's abstractions of course).
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!