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how to cope with continuous learning

 
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hey, I graduated from Polytechnic 4,5 years ago. Since then I was unemployed about 3/4 years. I don't thinkt that Polytechnic gave me all the skills needed in area of IT really. Skills needed at that time were Servlets, JSP, Struts, JDBC, EJB 2.0, maybe applets and swing. To get the job, I learned servlets, jsp,jdbc,structs by myself. Finally I was lucky enough to get the job. Since then I have been working for that company. But the tasks at the company don't really improve my skills. Because we use this custom framework and "only" POJOs and jsps are needed. OK, I've became more advanced in collections and learned design patterns/OOP by myself.

The thing is that as the economy is still quite bad, I'm bit afraid about keeping my job. Then I look what are the positions offered in ministry of labor. I see some java-jobs offered. Many of them are related to EE. Things related to EE are java annotations, hibernate,spring,JPA,EJB 3.0 (and servltets of course). I don't have much knowledge about these technologies. It would take several months to learn them by myself (as I'm still employed). Anyhow I fear that when I would have learned these things, most of them would have become obsolete.

Also, I'm bit afraid even the position of java. Maybe in couple of years new languages like scala and ruby will overtake java. How do you see the situation? "Is java dying?" Also, how do you copy with needed continuous (massive) learning? It's also quite frustrating to notice that 90 % what you've learned in the past have become obsolete. So one has to "justify his spot" all the time.

I like java, and solving problems, but somehow I think maybe I should switch my job to other area..

Any answers greatly appreciated
 
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Yes. Continuous learning is part of the job as a developer. The skills you mentioned (hibernate, spring, etc) are quite common and you should absolutely learn them if you are looking for a job.

As far as school goes, most schools don't teach all the skills you need. They teach concepts and background.

Over time, it gets easier to learn new things because you see commonality in the underlying concepts. Look at someone you admire who has been in the industry for 20+ years. How many languages have they worked with? For example - COBOL, FORTRAN, C, C++, Java, etc. There is no reason to think Java will be the last.

If you don't like continuous learning, it is good to know now so you can consider a non-technology based career.
 
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Yes. Continuous learning is part of the job as a developer. The skills you mentioned (hibernate, spring, etc) are quite common and you should absolutely learn them if you are looking for a job.

As far as school goes, most schools don't teach all the skills you need. They teach concepts and background.

Over time, it gets easier to learn new things because you see commonality in the underlying concepts. Look at someone you admire who has been in the industry for 20+ years. How many languages have they worked with? For example - COBOL, FORTRAN, C, C++, Java, etc. There is no reason to think Java will be the last.

If you don't like continuous learning, it is good to know now so you can consider a non-technology based career.



I agree wholeheartedly with Jeanne!!!
One of the biggest joys of this career is the opportunity to learn continuously. There are new things coming up and it's exciting to put them to solve your problem. I have been doing it for almost a decade now and still enjoy this process so much that I have consciously kept myself away from full-fledged management!

Take a small break and assess if it's really "continuous learning" that you dislike or if there is something more to it. If after all this introspection if you realize that you indeed dislike "continuous learning", you should consider shifting to non-technology based career.
 
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It isn't only in computing that one requires continuous learning. It would be required for any job requiring thought.
 
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It isn't only in computing that one requires continuous learning. It would be required for any job requiring thought.



Agree with Campbell. I cant think of any profession that doesnt require continuous learning - Its part of career progression.
 
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I am faced with the same problem.

I've been continuously studying technologies and just found more and more I need to learn.
 
Tapio Niemela
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hi and thanks for your answers,

yes it seems that the more you think you know, the less you actually know..I mean if one hears from some new technology, he then maybe learns a bit about the new technology and then he sees how much there's related things to be studied..

It seems that continuous learning is needed in almost any profession, especially in the computing area..

Do you think that java will be around here for years to come? I think it will, look C and C++ and also looots of code have been made with java, so I don't think it will disappear, how do you see the situation?
 
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