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Supervisor's Behaviour

 
Ranch Hand
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Hi,

most of the supervisors are used to command the developers to do certain things in a way(example just create a connection in this way .. etc). but they wont explain why we are going on the particular way . if you ask the advantage or disadvantage about the approach, they wont give you proper answare instead they will scold you in that time .

but here in javaranch, most of the senior people are patient and discribing the advantage or disadvantage of a pattern(technique). but i doubt even they behave like what i say above in workplace ?

P.S.Sorry for my bad english
 
author and iconoclast
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There are bad supervisors in the world, no doubt, but of course there are good ones, too. Similarly, there are bad employees, and there are good ones. It's very hard to say in a given situation which categories the players fall into without knowing the people involved.

Some employers care about developing their employees, while others are perfectly happy to fire an inexperienced employee and bring in a new one. This depends on the nature of the employment (contract or on-roll,) on the nature of the work, and on the labor laws in the given country.

In my company, hiring folks is expensive and takes a long time, so we try hard to educate and develop our employees' abilities. When I'm leading a team, I tend to give out work at a fairly abstract level, then let the coder figure out how to do things themselves (with a lot of discussion available if they want.)

Of course, the software we build is generally research oriented and unique, and the coders I'm working with often have Ph.Ds. If I were leading a team of freshers developing yet-another-inventory-system, having already personally developed ten similar systems, I'd be pretty likely to spell out in more detail what I wanted based on that experience, and not be too interested in feedback from the employees. It could get very tiresome explaining over and over again why I wanted things done in a particular way. Once, to the team, sure, but not every time I asked for a new menu item!

Anyway, folks at JavaRanch are nice and helpful because for the most part the only reason senior people come here is because they are nice and helpful and like to help people learn. Mean people who didn't like to help wouldn't come by in the first place!
 
Desperado
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I was ready to respond to the original post when I read Ernest's reply, which makes me say "yeah, what Ernest said!"
 
Rancher
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Tony Alicea wrote:I was ready to respond to the original post when I read Ernest's reply, which makes me say "yeah, what Ernest said!"



yeah, "yeah, what Ernest said!"
 
author & internet detective
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Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:If I were leading a team of freshers developing yet-another-inventory-system, having already personally developed ten similar systems, I'd be pretty likely to spell out in more detail what I wanted based on that experience, and not be too interested in feedback from the employees.


Hypothetically of course. I think if you were dropped in that situation, you would still be interested in explaining the why and not just the what.

One of my teams at work has trained a few interns. (in college at the time - which means less experience than a fresher) We did explain both what and why. The what was because they didn't have enough experience to know. The why was so they could apply the knowledge.

I've worked on projects where the lead came from the two varying camps:
1) Don't question me - I'm not sharing information
2) Ask questions and I'm happy to tell you why

Clearly I belong to camp #2 and like it better. I think there are going to be more camp #2 people over time. Web 2.0 is all about information sharing. Even if you can't share publicly for security reasons (like where I work), we still have an internal wiki/blog and Facebook type thing.
 
Ranch Hand
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Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:If I were leading a team of freshers developing yet-another-inventory-system, having already personally developed ten similar systems, I'd be pretty likely to spell out in more detail what I wanted based on that experience, and not be too interested in feedback from the employees. It could get very tiresome explaining over and over again why I wanted things done in a particular way. Once, to the team, sure, but not every time I asked for a new menu item!



I think OP is referring this thing. You feel tiresome while other scold. But developers have curiosity that why you have suggested X and not Y. So according me even if someone have developed Hospital Management System many times, I would explain them atleast why I am suggesting X solution eventhough it's very less likely to get better solution.

But there is other kind of Supervisor also who actually doesn't know any solution other than that. So they insist to follow that solution.

Jeanne has extended and completed EFH's answer very well.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Vikas Kapoor wrote: You feel tiresome while other scold.


That's a problem to be solved. I put the explanation on our internal wiki and direct people to it. That way I don't have the opportunity to get tired/cranky from answering the same thing over and over.
 
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