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Art of Java: how and what frameworks are covered?

 
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Hi there!
I whould like to know what frameworks are covered and how are they covered.
By that I mean:
- the depth of the discussion of each framework
- what is the level of understanding the reader is supposed to have to understand each one
- if the book covers any helper tools, IDEs, etc
- if all XML deployment and configuration files required by the frameworks are covered
- and more importantly: does the book have any real-world exemple of use of any of the frameworks discussed, or has design tips, or real-world situations where whould be great to use XXX framework for exemple...
Thanks for any reply, and sorry for so much especific questions... but here in Brazil books are so expensive, I have to be shure if the investment is going to be rewarding. =]
 
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I cover Struts, Tapestry, WebWork, Velocity, InternetBeans Express, and Cocoon.

- the depth of the discussion of each framework


I cover architecture and design of each framework and implement the same sample application in each framework, so that they can be compared on an equal basis. I do not go into the level of detail on each framework that an entire book dedicated to the framework would.

- what is the level of understanding the reader is supposed to have to understand each one


If you understand the basics of Java web development (servlets and JSP), you will be fine. The book covers the evolution of development from servlets through JSP and custom tags and introduces Model 2 before I discuss the frameworks.

- if the book covers any helper tools, IDEs, etc


I also cover helper libraries (like JUnit, Axis, Jakarta Commons) and also some coverage of IDE's, particularly for debugging and performance tuning.

- if all XML deployment and configuration files required by the frameworks are covered


I do not offer an exhaustive treatment of them. However, I certainly show enough of them to get the sample application to deploy correctly. In other words, I don't use any "And the a miracle occurs" sections where I hide details required to get the framework to function correctly.

- and more importantly: does the book have any real-world exemple of use of any of the frameworks discussed, or has design tips, or real-world situations where whould be great to use XXX framework for exemple...


There is an entire chapter comparing and contrasting the frameworks, which highlights the situations where a particular framework is useful. The third part of the book provides best practices, in a real world setting, using Model 2 web applications to show how to handle common user interface requirements, performance tuning, resource management, debugging, testing, etc.
Hope that answers your questions.
 
bengt hammarlund
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Thanks! Seems like a GREAT book to have to be up-to-date with these frameworks, and knowing just about what you need to choose the best for the specific project needs. I think that too much detail should be left to dedicated books, but ANY book should cover at least the very basic to deploy an application using any tools covered (not only the framework). It's frustating have to go on reading without having tested the application yourself, just because of little missing deployment details that would be 1 page long at most.
Seems like your book have these requirements and even a little more. I'm already looking forward to have one copy, if I can afford it when it comes out. It's out yet?
Thanks again. Good luck with this book and with your career!
[ February 12, 2004: Message edited by: bengt hammarlund ]
 
Neal Ford
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It's out yet?


Yes, indeed. Here it is on Amazon.com
 
Greenhorn
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Originally posted by Neal Ford:
I cover Struts, Tapestry, WebWork, Velocity, InternetBeans Express, and Cocoon.
/////////////////////////////
This would be the most interesting to see..
//////////////////////////////
There is an entire chapter comparing and contrasting the frameworks, which highlights the situations where a particular framework is useful. The third part of the book provides best practices, in a real world setting, using Model 2 web applications to show how to handle common user interface requirements, performance tuning, resource management, debugging, testing, etc.
//

Hope that answers your questions.

 
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