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Does JSF 2.0 perform >significantly< better than 1.2?

 
Peter Wippermann
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We're facing some performance issue with our portal and would like to evaluate that.
Do you have any experiences regarding the performance? Or can you even name, what's been done to increase the performance in 2.0?
 
Jason Porter
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Ed can expand on this, but JSF2 is more performant than JSF 1.2. State saving has received a huge improvement (it only saves diffs now, instead of the whole thing) improving both memory usage as well as processing time. I know there have been others, but this is the only one that's sticking out in my mind right now.
 
Marco Ehrentreich
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Hi Peter,

and welcome to the JavaRanch

Maybe that's a stupid question but what makes you so confident that you have a performance problem which is related to JSF? I'm currently working on a Struts (1.x) based web applications and we have performance bottlenecks but the problems were never near the view layer of the application. Just asking because I'm curious...

Marco
 
Vyas Sanzgiri
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How did you conclude that JSF 1.2 was the problem?
 
Peter Wippermann
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Vyas Sanzgiri wrote:How did you conclude that JSF 1.2 was the problem?


I can't tell yet. My bachelor thesis will be about the evaluation if we could solve our performance issues (better: improve the hardware requirements) by replacing JSF 1.2 with 2.0.

I'm glad to hear from Jason, that my task is likely to succeed and show a real benefit. I will start in March, so unfortunately I don't know enough about the topic and the specific problem we have yet.
I just heared of the promotion here and wanted to take the chance to get some hints for my upcoming thesis, where I could start my analysis. And of course I hope to win a copy of the reference, that would be nice indeed

So is there any JSF implementation I should prefer?
How would you design an examplary application for performance tests?

 
Marco Ehrentreich
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Hi Peter,

this sounds like you have to create a sample application and compare the performance of JSF 1.2 and JSF 2.0 for the view layer, right?

If I got this right the requirements are a bit vague, I'd say. This way it would be easily possible to get any result you like. For example imagine a data driven business application deployed on a cluster of application servers which use a single database server. For this scenario the performance bottleneck will most likely be the database and the performance difference of the view layer won't make much difference here.

So you should be careful about the type of sample application you want to create. Maybe it would be a good start to have a look about typical real world applications and think about which one most likely does NOT involve other performance bottlenecks than the view layer. And of course it depends on your experience and time you have to create this app.

Marco
 
Vyas Sanzgiri
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I agree you should look out for complex real world applications to prove your point and not a simple database app. For eg. you can probably check if there are any known issues or performance problems in any area or go through the release notes.
 
Ed Burns
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I'm trying to get through as many of these as possible in a short time, so here's a brief answer: the biggest improvement is partial state saving. With this approach, you can decrease the amount of memory per view by a factor of four.

Ed
 
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