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Struts vs Tapestry

 
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Hi
I need some informattion about how tapestry compares with Struts . I am using Struts for more than a year now and just when am getting comfortable with the framework my project leader is planning to use Tapestry instead of Struts in the next project ! I heard that Tapestry has a steeper learning curve than Struts , but it is 'better' than Struts - but my question is in what way it is better than Struts ?
I would be glad if anyone who has used both can give me more insight into this .

Thanks
 
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Ghosh,
check this thread

hth,
sunitha
 
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i am a struts user,and i have learned a little Tapestry,just a little,so that i can't conclude which one is better,i don't like the Tapestry in that it don't use the taglib in the view,instead a new script language is used(it is an other open project of the apache),but i think you must master both of them,the struts is popular in nowaday,and at same time,the Tapestry is introduced in other apache project,if you become familiar with the Tapestry,maybe it will be helpful to you to study others.
 
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I think it's very important to know what kind of web application you are going to build before you can decide which framework fits you best.

I'm going to develop a CMS which means that the system must be very flexible to build new web sites. I have checked out Tapestry a little bit but unfortunately haven't find any real good documentation (Struts beats Tapestry there!)

Tapestry uses a very beautiful implementation of the MVC-pattern but I wonder how fast it is in consideration that Tapestry create an object for each page and component and store the objects in a pool. Struts in contrast e.g. uses javabeans which is created within a scope when they are accessed.

I haven't got into JSF yet because they seems lika a quite new technology and I want in to use well-tested and stable ones. Correct me if I'm wrong Another framework that seems intresting is WebWorks from openSymphony.
 
Gerome Kawa
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Hey All
Thanks for the inputs and the links.
I am learning Tapestry and would be able to give some inputs too.
I appreciate the argument given above by one of our friends in this thread is how to weigh the pros and cons of Tapestry/Struts depending on the needs of the project !
Carry on giving your inputs.

Cheers
Kausik
 
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From what I've read recnetly, it sure seems like Tapestry is a very nice framework, but I do have one concern:

Given JSF, and the fact that it SEEMS to be a competitor for Tapestry more so than for Struts or Swing, do you think that Tapestry is viable long term?

I mean, Sun sure seems like they want to push JSF, so doesn't it make sense that it will dominate?

Please tell me if I'm wrong here. I'd like to use Tapestry (read good things) but only if it has a long term future....not something that will be hard to find coders for in the not so distance future.
 
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Originally posted by Darrin Smith:
From what I've read recnetly, it sure seems like Tapestry is a very nice framework, but I do have one concern:

Given JSF, and the fact that it SEEMS to be a competitor for Tapestry more so than for Struts or Swing, do you think that Tapestry is viable long term?

I mean, Sun sure seems like they want to push JSF, so doesn't it make sense that it will dominate?

Please tell me if I'm wrong here. I'd like to use Tapestry (read good things) but only if it has a long term future....not something that will be hard to find coders for in the not so distance future.




Darrin,

You have a valid point in the concerns you've raised. On the other hand I don't believe only technologies with Sun's backing succeeds in our fast changing industry. Take a look at Struts. It has no Sun backing but look at how successful it's been. Another example is Hibernate. Besides Sun's backing of JDO, a competitor of Hibernate, it hasn't been adopted as widely as Hibernate. Not even close! I can say with certainty that if you place a job ad today looking for coders for JDO vs Hibernate, you'll find far more Hibernate coders than you would for JDO. The future of JDO now seems questionable because of Hibenate-like features that would be adopted for the persistence layer in EJB 3.0. Hibernate now seems to be the industry standard. These are just a few examples that demonstrate that a technology without Sun's backing can also succeed.
However, I should be sincere and say that I also had the same concerns about Tapestry about a year ago when Tapestry wasn't an Apache project. But these concerns disappeared when Tapestry became an Apache project. As you may know, Apache has come to attain a status in our industry that is a well respected one. This gives the confidence that support and development of Tapestry would go on unabated. And I believe there is also the will and motivation at Apache to successfully compete against JSF, like they've succeeded with several other projects.

That was my 0.02 cents.

Best regards,

Francis
[ May 19, 2004: Message edited by: Francis Amanfo ]
 
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Originally posted by Francis Amanfo:
Besides Sun's backing of JDO, a competitor of Hibernate, it hasn't been adopted as widely as Hibernate. Not even close! I can say with certainty that if you place a job ad today looking for coders for JDO vs Hibernate, you'll find far more Hibernate coders than you would for JDO. The future of JDO now seems questionable because of Hibenate-like features that would be adopted for the persistence layer in EJB 3.0.


Don't forget that JDO 2.0, which is a lot farther in the JSR pipeline than EJB 3.0, will incorporate a lot of the things why people prefer Hibernate over JDO 1.0.1 today... Having said that, it would be odd if an open source project wouldn't be ahead of a standard like JDO which aims to standardize an API, mostly based on the features introduced earlier by innovating vendors.

You are absolutely correct, though, in that Sun's backing is not a prerequisite for a product to be endorsed by the developer community.
 
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