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JBoss vs Others

 
Greenhorn
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I've primarily developed applications with IBM products and have virtually no experience with JBoss servers although I'm debating whether or not I should spend some time exploring JBoss.

Can you provide a few key advantages of using JBoss AS vs WebSphere Application Server (vs WebSphere Community Edition aka Geronimo) (vs any other app servers you may have experience with)?

Also....

I've been using the Spring/Hibernate stack for awhile now.... but I've noticed that Seam/EJB3 stack could be a valid substitute. Can you provide a couple key advantages of using the SEAM/EJB3 stack over Spring/Hibernate? (Or am I comparing apples to oranges?)

Thanks in advance
 
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E Cho wrote:I've primarily developed applications with IBM products and have virtually no experience with JBoss servers although I'm debating whether or not I should spend some time exploring JBoss.

Can you provide a few key advantages of using JBoss AS vs WebSphere Application Server (vs WebSphere Community Edition aka Geronimo) (vs any other app servers you may have experience with)?

Also....

I've been using the Spring/Hibernate stack for awhile now.... but I've noticed that Seam/EJB3 stack could be a valid substitute. Can you provide a couple key advantages of using the SEAM/EJB3 stack over Spring/Hibernate? (Or am I comparing apples to oranges?)

Thanks in advance


Hi
don't have a great experience on Websphere, even if I have worked with Weblogic server for several years. What I can tell you is that technically they are both great products for delivering enterprise solutions. The advantage of vendor application servers is that they have consolidated a commercial/technical support for years while opensource products have fewer specialists available. They also have usually better documentation because they are written from a single group of people.

On the other hand, open source application server are fueled by the community of developers so it's likely they are easier to adapt to suit your needs. JBoss 5 is a perfect example of this because it is completely modular, you can add/remove pieces and create your custom server configuration Java EE compatible or not. You can even run RubyOnRails or PHP applications by adding/configuring modules.

JBoss AS it's also the easier AS to use: Unzip it to install it. Copy a file in a "deploy" folder to deploy. Launch the start up script with a "-c all" parameter to start in a cluster. No other AS is easier can perform the basic tasks in such a simple way.

Also, from the commercial point of view, using an OS application server doesn't require an immediate committment which is important in a difficult scenario like this one we're living. You can start with 0 license cost and then choose a support from RedHat (for example) if you plan to expand your business.

About comparing Hibernate and EJB, well it's not possible: they are two different things. You can rather compare JPA and Hibernate. Both have their advantages: JPA is a standard specification which guarantees greater flexibility while Hibernate is a de facto standard OR Mapping tool. Often it depends if you are starting a brand new project (maybe JPA) or if you are mantaining an existing one (keep Hibernate rocking).
Hope it helps
Francesco
 
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Extension to Francesco's response....

Instead of seperating JPA and Hibernate, take advantage of combining together and unleash the power of two.

JPA is from Sun, this is very popular and lightweight framework to overcome all the difficulties encountered with EJB2.
One nice feature it has is Annotations (avoids lengthy deployment descriptors) and can be used outside of the container. And it has nice feature of plugging-in third-party persistence providers such as Hibernate.

Mostly, people do not use the JPA API alone to work with persisted objects, rather, JPA annotations are only used to define the ORM mappings. JPA here is very trivial.
By using standard JPA annotations to markup a set of POJOs and then persist the POJOs by configuring Spring to use the Hibernate.
 
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