• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Junilu Lacar
  • Henry Wong
Sheriffs:
  • Ron McLeod
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Tim Cooke
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Frits Walraven
  • Tim Holloway
  • Carey Brown
Bartenders:
  • Piet Souris
  • salvin francis
  • fred rosenberger

why interviewer ask to candidate "how many offers you have with you"

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 588
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
why interviewer ask to candidate "how many offers you have with you"
 
Sheriff
Posts: 67399
173
Mac Mac OS X IntelliJ IDE jQuery Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Nosey?
 
Rancher
Posts: 43016
76
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Because it's in the best interest of the interviewer to know how many offers you have, and of what kind and pay they are. Of course, it's in your best interest not to tell them.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most likely attempting to measure the interest of other employers to see if you are worthy or a good candidate. So, in theory, if the company likes you AND you are tending others job offers, then they will be more confident in you and maybe extend an offer to you. If they are unsure about you and you have NO offers, they they may not extend an offer to you. It's a cooky theory and has a bunch of flaws.

It is best not to share any information about other prospective employers or job offers.

If you are confident and have a solid background, you can strongly state that "I'm sorry, this is confidential and I'm not comfortable sharing this information at this point."

If you are an expert in your field, you can strongly say, "None of your business."

If you are a little unsure about anything in the interview, then you can mildly just pick your nose (right nostril) and say nothing

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 710
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

James Clarks wrote:

If you are a little unsure about anything in the interview, then you can mildly just pick your nose (right nostril) and say nothing



Would that be my right, the interviewer's right, or stage right?
 
Author
Posts: 3445
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

James Clarks wrote:Most likely attempting to measure the interest of other employers to see if you are worthy or a good candidate. So, in theory, if the company likes you AND you are tending others job offers, then they will be more confident in you and maybe extend an offer to you. If they are unsure about you and you have NO offers, they they may not extend an offer to you. It's a cooky theory and has a bunch of flaws.



Very good point.

It is best not to share any information about other prospective employers or job offers.



Agree. If you have any other offers or talking to other companies, you may say something like got one other offer and talking to two other companies without giving away too much about the company names, type of offer, type of role, etc. I have used this effectively to negotiate. You can always say sorry, I can't go into too much detail at this stage. I believe it is part of selling yourself.


On the flip side, if you don'y have any other offers or not talking to any other companies, you could politely say sorry, I cannot discuss this at this stage.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 597
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you do not have any offer in hand then you can say. I just have started looking. This is my first interview after I started looking.
Even if you have offers, still should not disclose. Let them guess. On questions of salary expectations, offers in hand never give straight forward answers. This is what I found right.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
keep them guessing by saying
"No but I am expecting some of these very soon".
Note that you dont need to say a word more. if they try to probe more ask them to make an offer.
 
author
Posts: 23877
142
jQuery Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser VI Editor C++ Chrome Java Linux Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Haven't been to tons of interviews... but I can't imagine that I would be insulted, or feel that I need to hide such information. What is wrong with telling the truth?

If anything, this is dangerous on the interviewer's part. If it is seen as trying to make the lowest possible offer, it can insult the candidate (to either not accept, or leave for a better offer in a few months).

Henry
 
srishal singh
Ranch Hand
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Henry Wong wrote:
Haven't been to tons of interviews... but I can't imagine that I would be insulted, or feel that I need to hide such information. What is wrong with telling the truth?

If anything, this is dangerous on the interviewer's part. If it is seen as trying to make the lowest possible offer, it can insult the candidate (to either not accept, or leave for a better offer in a few months).

Henry



The interviewr is trying to gain information and he benefits both ways (if you answer honestly).
if you say you dont have any offer then he knows that he has no competetion and probably will low-ball the offer.
if you say I have offers he may ask further questions specific to the offers which is again unwanted situation bcos he is gaining information again on how much you are worth.
If he knows how much you are offered then obviously that is the maximum limit or upper range for his offer.
In a negotiation scenario giving too much info about you is not desirable.

I hope this makes it clear.
 
Henry Wong
author
Posts: 23877
142
jQuery Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser VI Editor C++ Chrome Java Linux Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

srishal singh wrote:
The interviewr is trying to gain information and he benefits both ways (if you answer honestly).
if you say you dont have any offer then he knows that he has no competetion and probably will low-ball the offer.
if you say I have offers he may ask further questions specific to the offers which is again unwanted situation bcos he is gaining information again on how much you are worth.
If he knows how much you are offered then obviously that is the maximum limit or upper range for his offer.
In a negotiation scenario giving too much info about you is not desirable.

I hope this makes it clear.



I didn't say that I didn't understand why certain people won't want to "give up" this information. I just said that I can't see any benefit from this.

The interview process is a two way street. To try to save a few thousand dollars, that will lower your chance to get the person that you want (which may cost you much more than that, if you hire someone less competent), doesn't make much sense.

In other words, this argument is valid if you believe that all jobs are equal, and hence, you pick the highest paying one; and if you believe that all people are interchangeable, and hence, you pick the one that is willing to get paid the least.

Henry
 
Jimmy Clark
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

It's a cooky theory and has a bunch of flaws.



In my opinion, it is a poor question to "ask". In my opinion, this question indicates that there is a disconnect between the interviewer and the candidate, and conveys that the interviewer is not focused on the right areas, i.e. most likely looking for shortcuts and/or is unsure about their own interview process, e.g. quality, comprehensiveness, etc.

Aside, its three healthy digs on your right side with your left forefinger. Make sure that you don't pull anything out, you might offend the interviewer
 
arulk pillai
Author
Posts: 3445
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

i.e. most likely looking for shortcuts and/or is unsure about their own interview process, e.g. quality, comprehensiveness, etc.



Very true. The more comprehensive the interview process is, the better chance you have to work with high calibre people. Very rarely does this question pop up from prospective employers. I also tend to agree with Hendry on being honest about your answer. I don't think there is much to hide except for the salary details.
 
Sandeep Awasthi
Ranch Hand
Posts: 597
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Well I wish I can be honest with these questions. But that does not work. At least in India. You never know what is intention behind these questions.
 
Bartender
Posts: 11445
19
Android Google Web Toolkit Mac Eclipse IDE Ubuntu Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feel asking such a question is non productive.
To start with the interviewer knows the candidate will withhold information or beat around the bush.
The interviewee knows he can do so.
Both know that both know this fact.
Waste of time in my opinion.
 
srishal singh
Ranch Hand
Posts: 33
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I didn't say that I didn't understand why certain people won't want to "give up" this information. I just said that I can't see any benefit from this.

The interview process is a two way street. To try to save a few thousand dollars, that will lower your chance to get the person that you want (which may cost you much more than that, if you hire someone less competent), doesn't make much sense.

In other words, this argument is valid if you believe that all jobs are equal, and hence, you pick the highest paying one; and if you believe that all people are interchangeable, and hence, you pick the one that is willing to get paid the least.

Henry

There is a benefit to employer if the interviewee doesnt know the tactic he may be hired for less . Cost does matter

Your second point assumes that employee is in demand however it may not be always true(remember recent recession).
Last point is true. Unfortunately most managers /decision makers I came across believe the last assumption(ie people == commodity and are interchangeable).
 
Henry Wong
author
Posts: 23877
142
jQuery Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser VI Editor C++ Chrome Java Linux Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

srishal singh wrote:
Your second point assumes that employee is in demand however it may not be always true(remember recent recession).
Last point is true. Unfortunately most managers /decision makers I came across believe the last assumption(ie people == commodity and are interchangeable).



Interestingly, the recession only proved that good employees are in even more demand. With so little slots for jobs, you would think that managers have the upper hand. In truth, with so little job openings for projects, managers couldn't take the risk on hiring wrong, as one mis-hire could mean failure, as there isn't enough people to take up the slack.

Henry
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1162
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In india this question is legit. I always answer something like "I've been interviewing and feel confident about a couple of the places I interviewed at." If the interviewer asks you this question, you can also use this to put pressure on them to make a decision quicker. You can say something like "I intend to make a final decision by the end of the week"
 
The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts -Marcus Aurelius ... think about this tiny ad:
Devious Experiments for a Truly Passive Greenhouse!
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/paulwheaton/greenhouse-1
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic