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Spring in Action Book Question - An expert opinion

 
Greenhorn
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I'm being very honest, it is NOT of my interest to start a discussion about the best framework. What I am REALLY interested of it is in an EXPERT opinion from a smart guy like you. I'm using Seam right now for developing a web application at work. I chose this framework because "imoh" was the easiest but most complete solution for my "problem". Could you give me some points that I could miss in my choice over Spring MVC and/or Grails?

Thank you very much !
 
author
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I'll be honest...I've only tinkered with Seam a tiny little bit. So I'm probably not all that qualified to answer your question.

That said...The new annotation-based Spring @MVC is so very simple and yet very flexible. It's certainly different than Seam. But I can't imagine it being more difficult than Seam.

For example, just to give a taste of what can be done in Spring @MVC, here's how you might write a simple controller class:



This controller will respond to requests for "/product/{productId}" requests, use a service to lookup the product information, place that information into the model, and then direct the request to the "productPage" view. Simple enough...and kinda RESTful at the same time.

As for the view itself, that's a job that falls to a view resolver. Depending on the request, that view resolver could produce an HTML, JSON, XML, Atom, RSS, or some other view output.
 
Armando Flores Ibarra
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Thank you very much for your answer !
 
Consider Paul's rocket mass heater.
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