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Spring MVC

 
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Hi Craig,
I have been using Spring for quite some time now. However, even though I know it, I haven't used Spring MVC.
I am considering going with Spring MVC for a 'small' project (2 people 1 month).
Can you suggest - with your insights about learning curve - if is worth studying the new MVC (annotations, etc) or should I go ahead with old one. What are major changes besides annotations and does Spring MVC it have as good support as struts2?
 
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Hi Amit,

I'm not Craig and I know this isn't what you were asking, but one of the easiest ways to use Spring MVC is with Grails. The power of Spring MVC (and other Spring goodness) without all the complexity.

Take a look at : http://grails.org/Developer+-+Spring+MVC+Integration
 
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I'm going to agree with Dave about Grails (btw...hi there Dave!) and add one better: Spring Roo is a great way to learn Spring. Let Roo produce code for you, then study it to see what Roo did.

I wouldn't bother learning the old Spring MVC at all...unless you absolutely must (because you're on a project that uses it, let's say). The annotation approach is so much better and more flexible...and much easier to write tests for.
 
Amit kull
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Dave and Craig,
Thanks for the answers.
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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