• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

I love when I can answer my own questions before I ask you guys  RSS feed

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 36
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm just sayin'... I almost bothered you with questions about casting unknown types and accessing static methods, and figured it out on my own.

Almost makes me think I have a chance at learning this stuff
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 820
IntelliJ IDE Tomcat Server VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
richard rehl wrote:I'm just sayin'... I almost bothered you with questions about casting unknown types and accessing static methods, and figured it out on my own.

Almost makes me think I have a chance at learning this stuff


I must have typed hundreds of questions into javaranch and before submitting I have to write: "I've tried....."
and more times than not, I come up with something I haven't tried yet.
 
author and iconoclast
Sheriff
Posts: 24217
38
Chrome Eclipse IDE Mac OS X
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Congratulations! Yes, I know the feeling.

Very often, the act of explaining something to someone else is enough for you to figure out the problem. This has been called the "rubber duck effect" -- you can explain your problem to an inanimate object like a rubber duck, and you still receive the benefit.
 
richard rehl
Ranch Hand
Posts: 36
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Congratulations! Yes, I know the feeling.

Very often, the act of explaining something to someone else is enough for you to figure out the problem. This has been called the "rubber duck effect" -- you can explain your problem to an inanimate object like a rubber duck, and you still receive the benefit.


...except, more often than not, I feel like the rubber duck.
 
Tim McGuire
Ranch Hand
Posts: 820
IntelliJ IDE Tomcat Server VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Congratulations! Yes, I know the feeling.

Very often, the act of explaining something to someone else is enough for you to figure out the problem. This has been called the "rubber duck effect" -- you can explain your problem to an inanimate object like a rubber duck, and you still receive the benefit.


A former boss of mine called this the "Nodding Dummy". He'd sit there and nod while I explained a problem to him. He didn't understand a word, but I was often able to work it out for myself.
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 710
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That's part of the reason most of the people I went to college with thought I was crazy! I would go to the computer lab to do some coding homework, and would proceed to talk to myself for the majority of the time I was in there. Most of the talking would end with me hitting myself in the head and saying "I'm dumb..." when I figured out my stupid mistakes. And, more than once, I might have begged the computer to work.....
 
author
Sheriff
Posts: 23295
125
C++ Chrome Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser Java jQuery Linux VI Editor Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
W. Joe Smith wrote:That's part of the reason most of the people I went to college with thought I was crazy! I would go to the computer lab to do some coding homework, and would proceed to talk to myself for the majority of the time I was in there.


For the really tough problems (which is rare in frequency), when trying to work out the design, or trying to work out the edge conditions, I have to talk to myself while walking. Colleagues who know me, just get use to this, but new employees tend to get freaked out when someone walks by their cubical, about a hundred times a day, mumbling to himself.

Of course, currently, I work from home, so no freaking people out at the moment....

Henry
 
author & internet detective
Marshal
Posts: 37518
554
Eclipse IDE Java VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Henry Wong wrote:For the really tough problems (which is rare in frequency), when trying to work out the design, or trying to work out the edge conditions, I have to talk to myself while walking. Colleagues who know me, just get use to this, but new employees tend to get freaked out when someone walks by their cubical, about a hundred times a day, mumbling to himself.

I think when I walk too. This has been a problem lately as I've encountered too many people in the hallway that wanted to discuss something and couldn't get the uninterrupted time. I wound up sitting in a quiet spot (that was not my cube), but it wasn't as effective. I think I may have to leave the floor to walk!
 
Java Cowboy
Sheriff
Posts: 16060
88
Android IntelliJ IDE Java Scala Spring
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
richard rehl wrote:...except, more often than not, I feel like the rubber duck.

But isn't it nice that you can help other people without any effort at all?

At the project where I'm working on now, we do code reviews. Before you check in your code in the version control system, you have to have another developer review it, by explaining him what you did. We frequently experience the rubber duck effect here.
 
author
Sheriff
Posts: 8954
17
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
An old Go (the game) master taught us a strategy that can also work well with software design...

When you're imagining a strategy attempt to explain it - if you can't explain it without laughter ensuing you probably have to go back to the drawing board.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!