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Java Vs Groovy - A question from GIDS Seminar by Venkat Subramaniam

 
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Hi All,

Yesterday I attended GIDS (Great Indian Developers Summit) seminar in Bangalore.
There was a session 'Design patterns in Java and Groovy' given by Venkat Subramaniam in which he emphasized more on Groovy than Java. He said Groovy/Ruby/Scala (mainly Groovy) are going to be best languages in coming future and java is outdated because writing code in java is difficult than writing in any other above mentioned languages and whatever can be done in java can also be done in Groovy.

How truth it is? Are all these dynamic languages are going to be leading the industry in the coming future? Can somebody shed more light on this?

I posted this message in SCEA Group because architects have more information on this.

Thanks,
Chinna
 
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Chinababu Illa wrote:I posted this message in SCEA Group because architects have more information on this.


Don't you think you will get more information if you post this on Groovy forum?
Moving to Groovy.
 
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Yes, I agree, in Groovy you can do everything Java can do because you can use any Java code mixed in with the Groovy stuff. But Groovy gives you more on top of that such that you don't need getters or setters they are automatically there. You don't need semicolons, you don't need any imports on java.util or java.io

Also there are other cool things like closures, dynamic typing as well as static typing, triple quotes for strings over more than one line of code, and of course, you can't live without the elvis operator once you know about it.

Mark
 
Chinababu Illa
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Thanks for your information Mark.

It's very interesting. I think I should start working on Groovy.
Please point me if there are any good tutorials.

Thanks,
Chinna
 
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There are hundreds (thousands?) of tutorials available on the web.

Java has an impoverished model of abstraction; Groovy is a decent alternative (I find its syntax and a few language features a little weird at times, but when you come from a Lisp/Smalltalk background, languages with extensive syntax always seem a little crude :)
 
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Mark Spritzler wrote:Yes, I agree, in Groovy you can do everything Java can do because you can use any Java code mixed in with the Groovy stuff. But Groovy gives you more on top of that such that you don't need getters or setters they are automatically there. You don't need semicolons, you don't need any imports on java.util or java.io

Also there are other cool things like closures, dynamic typing as well as static typing, triple quotes for strings over more than one line of code, and of course, you can't live without the elvis operator once you know about it.

Mark



I don't agree with you Mark. The more options you give as user friendly, the more we forget the basics. I guess whatever Java is currently giving should be perfect for everyone to start with and work on programming languages. Even I prefer to start with C/C++. I was there for Venkat presentation on Groovy and I thought he was just advertising groovy may be he is getting something for it. I am working on Java for more than 5 years now and I worked on many other languages like C#, C++ but I still like Java.

East or West Java is the Best.
 
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Chinababu Illa wrote:Hi All,

Yesterday I attended GIDS (Great Indian Developers Summit) seminar in Bangalore.
There was a session 'Design patterns in Java and Groovy' given by Venkat Subramaniam in which he emphasized more on Groovy than Java. He said Groovy/Ruby/Scala (mainly Groovy) are going to be best languages in coming future and java is outdated because writing code in java is difficult than writing in any other above mentioned languages and whatever can be done in java can also be done in Groovy.

How truth it is? Are all these dynamic languages are going to be leading the industry in the coming future? Can somebody shed more light on this?

I posted this message in SCEA Group because architects have more information on this.

Thanks,
Chinna



Java is every green like C/C++. Still people use Cobol and you can think about Java as plenty of developers are using it for their product development. Java has been releasing many features to its base code and it is all useful and meaning full. I did not like venkat presentation at all as he was going out of his scope and telling all against Java to the students of different colleges. I felt he was trying to expose Groovy and other stuff for which he might get some good amount of referral money or something. but why he has to say such things like Java will not be there for the future to students? It is misguiding to the students. I hate such kind of presentations from the bottom of my heart.
Please do not go with venkat's words. He is utter non sense.

 
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