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Is there any reason why signed numerics are used?
Signed numeric:http://www.ucop.edu/irc/campus_specs/cgx/signed_num.html
Why use the last digit of a number to determine if a number is positive or negative?

Is there a story from previous Java version or programming problems that signed numerics was invented or used?

Thanks!
 
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chihwah li wrote:Is there any reason why signed numerics are used?
Signed numeric:http://www.ucop.edu/irc/campus_specs/cgx/signed_num.html
Why use the last digit of a number to determine if a number is positive or negative?

Is there a story from previous Java version or programming problems that signed numerics was invented or used?

Thanks!


For the same number of bytes, you can access bigger (positive) numbers, if you know for sure that you'll have positive numbers assigned to that variable.
 
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Shashank, did you read the link chihwah li provided? I don't think your explanation applies to that format; you're thinking of something else.
chihwah li wrote:IIs there a story from previous Java version or programming problems that signed numerics was invented or used?

The spec you quoted seems to have nothing to do with Java. Well, you could implement it in Java, or any other language, but it's independent of Java. Personally I've never seen that format before, and it looks rather strange and unintuitive to me. Can you show us another page that links to it, which might give us a hint what it's used for?
 
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Hi Mike --

I did a little Googling on this. It's apparently a COBOL thing. It's a way that signed numbers were stored on tape from COBOL. It seems like it was ad-hoc in nature; I don't think there was a standard format, but it's more of a concept with many implementations. Perhaps something you do when you're storing numbers as BCD rather than binary? Maybe it's older than one's complement? Can't be.
 
Mike Simmons
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Heh. I almost said it looks like the sort of thing they'd do back in the save-a-byte-where-you-can days of COBOL. Though I think we could easily come up with more readable alternatives. I wonder if there's supposed to be a meaningful difference between 1234 and 123D? Oh well. Thanks for tracking down the info, EFH!
 
Shashank Agarwal
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Ernest Friedman-Hill wrote:Hi Mike --

I did a little Googling on this. It's apparently a COBOL thing. It's a way that signed numbers were stored on tape from COBOL. It seems like it was ad-hoc in nature; I don't think there was a standard format, but it's more of a concept with many implementations. Perhaps something you do when you're storing numbers as BCD rather than binary? Maybe it's older than one's complement? Can't be.


It's a weird name they chose though "signed".
 
Mike Simmons
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I don't think so - that part is somewhat standard terminology in computer programming. A signed number can be either positive or negative, whereas an unsigned number can only be positive. It's just this particular way of representing signed numbers that's a bit... unusual.
 
chihwah li
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I ask this because the word signed at this page: Look at the attached picture.
It's from the book "Head first - Java" by Kathy Sierra & Bert Bates

signed.jpg
[Thumbnail for signed.jpg]
 
Mike Simmons
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Ah. Well, Head First is using the term "signed" in the same sense we were just talking about. It means that Java's byte, short, int, long, float and double can all be positive or negative. That's all it means. The "signed numerics" described in your other link can also be positive or negative. But there's no other connection, really. The format that other link discusses has nothing to do with Java or Head First.
 
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