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Software comapany startup tips? To make it Big

 
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Hello,

Does your book cover any information/tips to start our own software company?

I am having 3 years of experience in Software/J2EE/ECM domain.

What parameters should one consider while starting new software company? domain knowledge? risks? policies? etc...

Thanks
Nikesh
 
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If "Making it Big" doesn't cover what you need, I'd suggest the following two books which have rather unconventional business ideas aimed at start-ups.

Guy Kawasaki's "The Art of the Start"
37signals "Rework"
 
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Hi Nikes,

Thanks for asking about statrups. If my book book didn't cover startups I think I may have been sued for having a misleading book title! In fact an entire chapter of the book is about software startups; Chapter 20 "Going out on your own: the software statrup". As well, four people I interviewed in particular helped found major companies include: Diane Greene, cofounder of VMWave, which she headed as CEO for 10 years and helped grow to a 1 Billion dollar per year company. Marc Benioff, CEO and founder of Salesforce.com, which is now also about a billion dollar per year company. Steve Wozniak, inventor of the Apple computer, who cofounded Apple Inc with his buddy Steve Jobs, and Grady Booch who cofounded Rational Sofwtare.

I can't do your question justice in a single forum posting but I'll make a few points that I hope will be helpful:
1. The more you can do on your own, before pulling in other investors, the better. When other investors join you will lose control.
2. Good ideas alone aren't enough to make good business. One of the biggest reasons that startups fail is that some engineers think they can also run a business. Know your limits! If you need to recruit a CEO, or business development manager, or marketing lead, then when the timing is riught do it. It's a sign of strength not a sign of weakness to pull in others who can compliment your skills. Just look at Google. Sergey Brin and Larry Page were smart enough to know they needed a real business leader to help take Google to the next level, so they hired Eric Schmidt as their CEO.
3. A picture is worth a thousand words but a demo is worth a thousand pictures. Make sure you have a really compelling demo that you can use to showcase your ideas quickly to future customers and/or investors.
4. Leverage the breadth of the Internet to get yuour ideas and your sofwtare out to a wide audience. In the beginning having a lot of customers who can be your advocates and evangelists is more important than chargiung for your software. (of course that depends on the kind of software you are developing... but this is true most of the time)
5. Be sensitive to the need to get to revenue. This is especially true if you are using venture capital funding to fuel your R&D. Investors don't like to wait too long before seeing some traction. If you can keep the revenue rolling, even if it's not what you dreamed it would be, you have a hope of keeping the investments coming. Without revenue the investment funds will dry up all too quickly.

I hope you'll enjoy chapter 20 and the interviews with founders of some notable startups.

Sam
 
Nikes Shah
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Thanks Michael and Sam

Do you recommend any professional certification(s) or courses/degree to start up new company?
 
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