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java oracle community process  RSS feed

 
nimo frey
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I have a question about JCP and Oracle:


For example, JSF 2.0 which is a community process - does this techique, at the end, belongs to Oracle (Licensing,...)?

Is that fair against a community which makes new techniques, and and the end all the comminity efforts belongs to oracle?

Or did I miss the point?

 
Lester Burnham
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You need to differentiate between a specification and an implementation. The specifications are written by the JCP, and on their web site you'll find information about licensing of JCP specs. Not sure about the details, but there's no monetary cost to implement them.

Implementations, on the other hand, are free to choose whatever license they wish (or rather, their developers are). For example, the JSF home page states that Mojarra (the JSF RI) uses the CDDL + GPL license, whereas Apache MyFaces uses the Apache license.

I don't think too many developers or companies would be interested in getting involved in these efforts if they weren't free to use them afterwards.
 
nimo frey
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So the Intelectual Property of the Spec belongs to the Community and not to Oracle.

And I can use OpenJDK (with a open JRE?), so I can be totally independent of Oracle. Am I right?
 
Lester Burnham
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So the Intelectual Property of the Spec belongs to the Community and not to Oracle.

You'd have to read up on the JCP details to be certain about that. Licensing something for free does not imply giving up the IP. I'm fairly certain that JCP specs are not in the public domain.

And I can use OpenJDK (with a open JRE?), so I can be totally independent of Oracle.

Correct, OpenJDK is licensed under the GPL (which, again, does not mean that the OpenJDK developers have given up their IP).
 
nimo frey
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okay, got it. thanks!
 
nimo frey
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According to this http://blogs.oracle.com/henrik/2010/10/doug_lea_leaves_the_jcp_ec.html, I have some questions:

Is it reasonable, that oracle makes use of a java community (which does all there work for free?) without supporting projects such as openjdk with the Test Compatibility Kit? I mean, oracle sucks out all the good ideas of a community and integrate it within its product whithout supporting openjdk with Test Compatibility Kit. Is this fair? Or did I get anything wrong?
 
Lester Burnham
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Yes, you understood something wrong. For starters, Doug Lea does not talk about the TCK at all, so I'm not sure how that's related to your question. But more importantly, OpenJDK will be the basis for all future official Java releases, so they will be certified against the TCK. And Oracle will not just use community contributions - I suspect they will in fact be the largest contributor, just like Sun used to be.
 
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