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bug tracking system ?

 
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Hi All,

I didn't find any suitable forum than "Testing" to send this post. Moderators, you may fwd this post to most suitable forum.


Actually am leading a team of software developers. Usually we are lodging bugs in MS Word document which is shared b/w team members. Now issue is that client also get access on test application so he is also reporting bugs.

I am looking for a bug tracking system in which i can make accounts for client and my co. colleagues so that allowed people can update bug directly in it. And developers should also have access to same system/page where they can see their assigned bugs and update status once done. Means a common bug status page shared between all concern parties.

Please advise.

Thanks in advance.

Bye,
Viki.
 
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Hello Vikrama,


I can suggest you to check bug tracking from BontQ

You can creat many companies and assign to this companies your clients and etc.

Reply me if you find that this will help you.

 
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you can check BugZilla at http://www.bugzilla.org/
 
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If you're willing to spend a couple of bucks then I would recommend Jira.
 
Vikrama Sanjeeva
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Hi,

Thanks for the inputs. I am looking for open source (free of cost). I have heard of Bugzilla but never tried. Can somebody share experience with working Bugzilla in a situation i mentioned in my OP ?

Thanks

Bye,
Viki.
 
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I actually think our IDEs and other Tools forum is more appropriate since this about tools. Moving.
 
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Jira offers good deals, especially for open-source projects, but they had a $5 special last year that as far as I can remember was OK for use on commercial development. It's fairly easy to get up and running and a lot of its components are stock Java items such as the Jakarta packages.

I'm currently using Trac. Unlike Jira, it's not coded in Java - it's in Python, but it works quite well. It's one of the most popular issue-management systems for open-source projects. It not only manages tickets, it has a built-in wiki which is good for building up design documents, user reference information and whatever else you can think of to do with a wiki. Trac tickets can reference wiki entries and vice versa. Trac is also quite customizable, has a generous supply of third-party plug-ins, and integrates tightly with version control systems such as Subversion and IDEs like Eclipse. There's also decent security support, so you can restrict who can see and do things. I'd let you browse one of mine, but they're full of confidential client data. To make life simpler, I run Jira in appliance VMs. The VM contains the Apache webserver with WebDAV plugins, cvs and svn source code archives and the Trac code. I use external databases to hold the actual ticket/wiki data.

There is a wiki product for Jira now, although it's sold as a separate product.
 
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Then I also might throw in some alternatives
- Mantis (PHP)
- JTrac (Java)
- Redmine (Ruby)

Like Tim I was using a long time Trac which is really quite cool. I switched to Redmine which offered a bit more functionality and am since two years quite happy with it. (Main-reason for switching was, if I recall correctly, that Trac was not able to host more than one project at that time). But no matter which bugtracker you choose: everything is better than an office-document.
 
Tim Holloway
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I looked at most of those. In my particular case, I liked Trac best. based, I think, largely on easy of installation, although Trac isn't a slam-dunk itself.

Trac does allow multiple projects these days, BTW. I'm doing just that!
 
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