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reasons to work

 
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Seth Godin blogged about 8 reasons to work.

1. For the money
2. To be challenged
3. For the pleasure/calling of doing the work
4. For the impact it makes on the world
5. For the reputation you build in the community
6. To solve interesting problems
7. To be part of a group and to experience the mission
8. To be appreciated



He points out that #1 gets all the focus. We see that in this forum when people are deciding between packages. Or asking about what field/technology pays best. Taking a little poll, if all computer jobs paid exactly the same, had the same work environment and were of equal stress, which of these do you find most important?
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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I have trouble answering this myself - so many of them are important to me.
 
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Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:I have trouble answering this myself - so many of them are important to me.



Reasons #2 - #8 fall under a pretty big umbrella for me. This is like asking me to pick between roasted almond milk chocolate and ice cream. I love both !
 
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I will also add


Reason to learn more and acquire more skills This must be one of the considerations in chossing multiple job offers, escpecially in achieving your longer term career goals. I guess if you are challenged, you will learn more and acquire more skills.


To answer your question, I like #2, #1, #3, and #6.

 
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I think it also changes during someone professional lifetime. Just looking at the first two, someone who is either fresh out of school or with a few years of experience, is paid lower and may be somewhat overwhelmed, so is looking for more money, and has all the challenge that he/she needs. On the other hand, someone with 20+ years, has a higher salary, have lots of savings, etc., may be less concern with money, and looking for challenges since he/she is getting bored.

This also applies to #3 to #8 too. The 20+ year person will have a better idea of what he/she wants and wants to do (#3, #6, etc.); a bit more concerned with legacy (#4, #5, etc.); and is bit less concerned with career. etc.

Henry
 
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6. To solve interesting problems
 
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#3 mostly for me.... then the rest are side effects
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Janeice DelVecchio wrote:#3 mostly for me.... then the rest are side effects


I like this. Maybe that's why it is so hard to choose.
 
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For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefer.
 
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Well.. This is a very mixed bad for me. I totally agree with you that #1 steals the show always ( at least in my company/country). The reasons #2-#8 were the motivating factors for me when I was in school. Solving endless number of puzzles, crosswords, building little programs, oh it was just fun!! These days, workplace is a totally different story . I can't say/don't know how it for independent developers, but if you work for a consulting company/off shoring company, its all #1. Even you suggest something technical improvements , the question you are asked is How much cost saving or revenues it bring ? Does it bring any sales? Does it improve margin?

Sometimes I'm lost. Makes me wonder if I'm an engineer or a sales man !

Considering for your utopia ( )of same pay, same work environment and same stress ,I would say it is #3 for me.

 
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Lee Kian Giap wrote:For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefer.



Just curious...has this worked for you?
 
Lee Kian Giap
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Victor Ramen wrote:

Lee Kian Giap wrote:For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefer.



Just curious...has this worked for you?



Not yet working very well for me ... but I am sure it work for someone (minority), or else no employer will take you in as employee and pay you salary.

Everything is possibility and probability ... If you trust it and contribute on it, you have the chance to gain it ... If you don't trust it, then you won't get it, because without the passion, you are not motivated, and you will not contribute, and for sure it is impossible to sit and wait for it to come to you.
 
Henry Wong
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Lee Kian Giap wrote:

Victor Ramen wrote:

Lee Kian Giap wrote:For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefer.



Just curious...has this worked for you?



Not yet working very well for me ... but I am sure it work for someone (minority), or else no employer will take you in as employee and pay you salary.

Everything is possibility and probability ... If you trust it and contribute on it, you have the chance to gain it ... If you don't trust it, then you won't get it, because without the passion, you are not motivated, and you will not contribute, and for sure it is impossible to sit and wait for it to come to you.



This is actually a somewhat confusing detour to this topic. First, you state that you are purely in it for the money. You don't like the challenge, don't like the work, don't like the impact, don't like to solve interesting problems, etc. etc. etc. And even in the case of the money, the goal of the money is to get out of the rat race -- to do something else.

Then, you conclude that you need passion... To be blunt, if you don't like any of stuff named. Heck, even in the case of money, it is so that you can leave, how the heck can you have passion? Or do you mean faking passion?

Henry
 
Lee Kian Giap
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Henry Wong wrote:

Lee Kian Giap wrote:

Victor Ramen wrote:

Lee Kian Giap wrote:For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefer.



Just curious...has this worked for you?



Not yet working very well for me ... but I am sure it work for someone (minority), or else no employer will take you in as employee and pay you salary.

Everything is possibility and probability ... If you trust it and contribute on it, you have the chance to gain it ... If you don't trust it, then you won't get it, because without the passion, you are not motivated, and you will not contribute, and for sure it is impossible to sit and wait for it to come to you.



This is actually a somewhat confusing detour to this topic. First, you state that you are purely in it for the money. You don't like the challenge, don't like the work, don't like the impact, don't like to solve interesting problems, etc. etc. etc. And even in the case of the money, the goal of the money is to get out of the rat race -- to do something else.

Then, you conclude that you need passion... To be blunt, if you don't like any of stuff named. Heck, even in the case of money, it is so that you can leave, how the heck can you have passion? Or do you mean faking passion?

Henry



I think you have already put too much of presumption on behalf of me on all those thing that I didn't stated in previous post, you might need to clear your own confusion before debate endlessly ... those presumption is actually about yourself but not me.

Please refer back to the first post "which of these do you find most important? " doesn't means other is NOT important but means that LESS important.

Thanks ~
 
Victor Ramen
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#8 for me. Can never have enough of that.
 
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Lee Kian Giap wrote:

Victor Ramen wrote:

Lee Kian Giap wrote:For me is #1

Earn money, use the money to look for opportunity to earn passive income, and run out from rat race. When it cross a certain level, you don need to work for others, let the money work for you. At that time you can control #1 to #8, do whichever you like in anytime you prefe

Everything is possibility and probability ... If you trust it and contribute on it, you have the chance to gain it ... If you don't trust it, then you won't get it, because without the passion, you are not motivated, and you will not contribute, and for sure it is impossible to sit and wait for it to come to you.



in my view
For the money
To be challenged , you will learn more with curious, passion .

 
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In my view #1 steals the show because it is only thing you can be absolutly shore of while switching a job.
Rest of #2-#8 can vary along with circumsatnces.
Say you change a job for some company which offers you development work but by the time you join either the Vacancy is filled or project is scrapped then they'll give you some other work.
Also, even if you get that work, it is not bound to continue like that lifelong (at least for software sector). Some way down the line you will change project and #2-#8 will vary along with that.
 
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ofcourse, to the most of the people #1 is important i.e, 70% remaining 30% (#2 to #8)
 
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Actually i disagree with these 8 (think a few are the same, and may be missing some), but the difference in these sure seem to correlate to to the levels of Maslow

Types of Needs

Maslow believed that these needs are similar to instincts and play a major role in motivating behavior. Physiological, security, social, and esteem needs are deficiency needs (also known as D-needs), meaning that these needs arise due to deprivation. Satisfying these lower-level needs is important in order to avoid unpleasant feelings or consequences.

Maslow termed the highest-level of the pyramid as growth needs (also known as being needs or B-needs). Growth needs do not stem from a lack of something, but rather from a desire to grow as a person.

Five Levels of the Hierarchy of Needs

There are five different levels in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs:

Physiological Needs
These include the most basic needs that are vital to survival, such as the need for water, air, food and sleep. Maslow believed that these needs are the most basic and instinctive needs in the hierarchy because all needs become secondary until these physiological needs are met.

Security Needs
These include needs for safety and security. Security needs are important for survival, but they are not as demanding as the physiological needs. Examples of security needs include a desire for steady employment, health insurance, safe neighborhoods and shelter from the environment.

Social Needs
These include needs for belonging, love and affection. Maslow considered these needs to be less basic than physiological and security needs. Relationships such as friendships, romantic attachments and families help fulfill this need for companionship and acceptance, as does involvement in social, community or religious groups.

Esteem Needs
After the first three needs have been satisfied, esteem needs becomes increasingly important. These include the need for things that reflect on self-esteem, personal worth, social recognition and accomplishment.

Self-actualizing Needs
This is the highest level of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Self-actualizing people are self-aware, concerned with personal growth, less concerned with the opinions of others and interested fulfilling their potential.




ie: nothing new under the sun
 
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You can tell that I'm a geek. For me, #1 is at the bottom. Case in point right now, where I regularly turn down offers to return to Corporate America at a considerable boost in income in favor of being able to work in my own location on projects of my own choosing.

 
Steve Fahlbusch
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-- Tim,

According to Maslow (not i am not a Maslow fan, but in this case i dont see any issue) arn't (yes i know it is not a word, but hey this is psychology) you much closer to being self accualized (sp) then those working for the money.

I dont see this as being geekish, but as -- dare i say it -- more evolved.

-steve
 
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All the reasons you have listed to some extent, except #4,5 and 7 (Too small to make any bigger impact). #1 is slightly high on the list.

I would like to add 1 more.

# To run away from the Idle mind(Devil's workshop) and the whole universe. Can't face myself if I have lot of money and nothing to do.....
 
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More interesting is which wont apply to you!

1. For the money
Yes!
2. To be challenged
No!!! No!!! No!!! Sorry :-) I find challenges in all sorts of aspects of my life. And sometimes they bite each other. I want to be a good father, I want to do sports, I am fascinated by science in general. If I have to choose, I rather do the other things.
3. For the pleasure/calling of doing the work
Sometimes.
4. For the impact it makes on the world
Mwa?
5. For the reputation you build in the community
Yes.
6. To solve interesting problems
Sometimes a bit.
7. To be part of a group and to experience the mission
No!!! No!!! No!!! Oh I hate company outings and all act happy management!!!
8. To be appreciated
Yes, I want to make a general support to society.

So I really dislike 2 and 7!
Yeah managers hate me for it.
 
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Jan de Boer wrote:
2. To be challenged
No!!! No!!! No!!! Sorry :-) I find challenges in all sorts of aspects of my life. And sometimes they bite each other. I want to be a good father, I want to do sports, I am fascinated by science in general. If I have to choose, I rather do the other things.

7. To be part of a group and to experience the mission
No!!! No!!! No!!! Oh I hate company outings and all act happy management!!!

So I really dislike 2 and 7!
Yeah managers hate me for it.



IMO, it doesn't have to be about "putting a man on the moon" or "going to company outings" -- it could be simpler, like "working on something that is not boring" (as simple tasks generally are boring) or "working with people that you like".

I too, hate going to company outings -- as they seem forced. But I like to be part of a group, and working with people that I like.

Henry
 
Jan de Boer
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Henry Wong wrote:
I too, hate going to company outings -- as they seem forced. But I like to be part of a group, and working with people that I like.

Henry



Yes, of course. That is what I mean, the 'we all are going to meet this challenge' talk of the management. I don't dislike the people I work with and also I get my pleasure out of getting something to work. It's the 'Emiel Ratelband' talk.

(Ratelband is an overdone positive thinking management guru in the Netherlands)
 
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Tell management you are going to choose the location for the next trip. Let everybody else be bored to tears as you go round Tring Museum, for example.
 
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I prefer

1) To be appreciated ( it can include onsite opportunities, rewards and recognitions in the form of money and certificates) 40% i work for this

2) For the reputation you build in the community 10 %

3) for money 50 %


 
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To original Auther - A thief thinks everyone else is a thief. Not all the people are working for money some people working for job satisfaction.
 
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