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About Java Basics: Distributed  RSS feed

 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
I have started Sun Java Training Course Online and it tells me about advantages of using Java, one of them is because java is distributed.
I want to know your ideas about the subject Distributed. (RMI-CORBA-URL)

Why do we actually need to use this?
What are the advantages to use RMI?

I want to read and know your ideas instead of reading high-technical info on the Wiki or any other books.

Thanks
 
Ranch Hand
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Caglar Cataloglu wrote:
Why do we actually need to use this?
What are the advantages to use RMI?


how do you[your program running in your server/Jvm] access a java object which is running in another Jvm?
 
Caglar Cataloglu
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Seetharaman Venkatasamy wrote:

Caglar Cataloglu wrote:
Why do we actually need to use this?
What are the advantages to use RMI?


how do you[your program running in your server/Jvm] access a java object which is running in another Jvm?



but
why do i need to access a java object running in another Jvm?
 
Java Cowboy
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Suppose that you are writing software for a company that has a big online shop. For example, Amazon. They sell books all over the world and 24 hours per day, thousands of people are looking at Amazon's website and buying books.

For such an online shop system, you need more than a single server computer. A single computer would not be able to handle the thousands of people who want to use the system at the same time, and it would also be too vulnerable for failures - suppose something would break in the computer, then the whole shop would be down until the computer was repaired. So, for such systems, people use clusters of servers - multiple computers, sometimes very many computers, that work together and each handle part of the clients.

With Java, you can write a single program that works on all those computers at the same time. Java contains some technologies that make it easy for the different parts of the program that run on separate computers to work together. For example, RMI (remote method invocation) makes it easy to call methods of objects that are running in the JVM of another server.
 
Caglar Cataloglu
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Jesper de Jong wrote:Suppose that you are writing software for a company that has a big online shop. For example, Amazon. They sell books all over the world and 24 hours per day, thousands of people are looking at Amazon's website and buying books.

For such an online shop system, you need more than a single server computer. A single computer would not be able to handle the thousands of people who want to use the system at the same time, and it would also be too vulnerable for failures - suppose something would break in the computer, then the whole shop would be down until the computer was repaired. So, for such systems, people use clusters of servers - multiple computers, sometimes very many computers, that work together and each handle part of the clients.

With Java, you can write a single program that works on all those computers at the same time. Java contains some technologies that make it easy for the different parts of the program that run on separate computers to work together. For example, RMI (remote method invocation) makes it easy to call methods of objects that are running in the JVM of another server.



Great answer that i need to know, thanks, now Distributed Java and RMI makes sense
 
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Caglar Cataloglu wrote:Great answer that i need to know, thanks



That is our good buddy Jesper, always very wise!

If you want to get started and have an idea of how RMI works, please take a look here. I think it might be helpful!
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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