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Which java script framework is best ?

 
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Their is many java script frameworks are available today . Cause we are java programmers and familiar with java technologies so which framework is best for our applications like

EXT js
GWT Ext
jQuery
YUI
MOOTools
etc.
 
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The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.
 
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Eric Ford wrote:The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.



I strongly disagree with your first statement. Knowing a lot about something doesn't make it better than other thing. And about the bold text I agree partially, yes, that's ok but there are other factors to take in account such as performance, maintainance difficulty, etc... Maybe making something with FrameworkXX is very fast but is a mess to mantain the code, so the time to create is low but the time to mantain it is high.
 
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"Better" is completely subjective. The question is unanswerable.

You can ask "which framework do you prefer and why?", (I prefer jQuery, for example) but asking "which is better?" makes no sense.
 
author
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Eric Ford wrote:The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.




Eric,

You completely took the words out of my mouth.
 
Eric Ford
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Albareto McKenzie wrote:

Eric Ford wrote:The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.



I strongly disagree with your first statement. Knowing a lot about something doesn't make it better than other thing. And about the bold text I agree partially, yes, that's ok but there are other factors to take in account such as performance, maintainance difficulty, etc... Maybe making something with FrameworkXX is very fast but is a mess to mantain the code, so the time to create is low but the time to mantain it is high.



To mangle another quote, "the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know". If you happen to have the luxury of a flexible or relaxed development schedule and are able to invest the time to experiment with the different frameworks you could probably come up with an "informed" choice. However, depending solely upon the marketing literature or even advice garnered from forums such as this one for performance evaluations is risky. Many such postings are "emotional" in that the poster is biased towards his preferred solution (i.e., the one he knows the most about). If you as an individual happen to have direct experience with multiple frameworks then you would fall under my first statement and could choose between what you already know. As for code maintenance, it's a wonderful goal provided you, or your company, expect to end up maintaining that code. In many contracted development situations the products you work on may end up being maintained by someone altogether different - likely a competitor. While I absolutely agree that we each want to deliver the best product we possibly can, if your customer insists on short, aggressive schedules then you must make your decisions accordingly.
 
Shashank Agarwalg
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@all thanks for the comments but one thing like I knows much jquery and also likes it . and i thinks it fulfills my expectations .

But i wants to know why i switched to Ext JS.
 
Albareto McKenzie
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Eric Ford wrote:

Albareto McKenzie wrote:

Eric Ford wrote:The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.



I strongly disagree with your first statement. Knowing a lot about something doesn't make it better than other thing. And about the bold text I agree partially, yes, that's ok but there are other factors to take in account such as performance, maintainance difficulty, etc... Maybe making something with FrameworkXX is very fast but is a mess to mantain the code, so the time to create is low but the time to mantain it is high.



To mangle another quote, "the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know". If you happen to have the luxury of a flexible or relaxed development schedule and are able to invest the time to experiment with the different frameworks you could probably come up with an "informed" choice. However, depending solely upon the marketing literature or even advice garnered from forums such as this one for performance evaluations is risky. Many such postings are "emotional" in that the poster is biased towards his preferred solution (i.e., the one he knows the most about). If you as an individual happen to have direct experience with multiple frameworks then you would fall under my first statement and could choose between what you already know. As for code maintenance, it's a wonderful goal provided you, or your company, expect to end up maintaining that code. In many contracted development situations the products you work on may end up being maintained by someone altogether different - likely a competitor. While I absolutely agree that we each want to deliver the best product we possibly can, if your customer insists on short, aggressive schedules then you must make your decisions accordingly.



After this reply I even agree with your first statement (the one I strongly disagreed yesterday) but from the point of view of a worker, I was talking more from the point of view of a developer, with no (f**king) end dates and being free to choose.

I have have only worked for two companies but both mantained their own code, maybe it's a strange procedure, but that's why I find important maintenance.
 
Eric Ford
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Albareto McKenzie wrote:

Eric Ford wrote:

Albareto McKenzie wrote:

Eric Ford wrote:The "best" one is the one you already know the most about or the one that includes the most of what you need "to get the job done". After that, it's a matter of how much time do you have available to invest in learning a new framework.



I strongly disagree with your first statement. Knowing a lot about something doesn't make it better than other thing. And about the bold text I agree partially, yes, that's ok but there are other factors to take in account such as performance, maintainance difficulty, etc... Maybe making something with FrameworkXX is very fast but is a mess to mantain the code, so the time to create is low but the time to mantain it is high.



To mangle another quote, "the devil you know is better than the devil you don't know". If you happen to have the luxury of a flexible or relaxed development schedule and are able to invest the time to experiment with the different frameworks you could probably come up with an "informed" choice. However, depending solely upon the marketing literature or even advice garnered from forums such as this one for performance evaluations is risky. Many such postings are "emotional" in that the poster is biased towards his preferred solution (i.e., the one he knows the most about). If you as an individual happen to have direct experience with multiple frameworks then you would fall under my first statement and could choose between what you already know. As for code maintenance, it's a wonderful goal provided you, or your company, expect to end up maintaining that code. In many contracted development situations the products you work on may end up being maintained by someone altogether different - likely a competitor. While I absolutely agree that we each want to deliver the best product we possibly can, if your customer insists on short, aggressive schedules then you must make your decisions accordingly.



After this reply I even agree with your first statement (the one I strongly disagreed yesterday) but from the point of view of a worker, I was talking more from the point of view of a developer, with no (f**king) end dates and being free to choose.

I have have only worked for two companies but both mantained their own code, maybe it's a strange procedure, but that's why I find important maintenance.



I am in total agreement with the importance of coding for maintenance as well as functionality. I have had that wonderful experience of supporting code in production that was originally written to be a prototype but ended up being deployed and patched like a quilt.
 
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