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Seven Languages Question

 
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Hello Bruce -

I have a little knowledge of Ruby and Scala; listening to talks and some self experimentation. I like how Scala removes some of the bloat form the source files and with Ruby I like the seamless use of MVC. I am interested in some of the other functional languages and learning what they have to offer. I am a big proponent of the right tool for the job. I work in a Java shop and at times it is difficult to introduce new technologies or languages to our team and environment. What advice can you give me to introduce some of these languages into my work place?

Thanks in advance!
Brett
 
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Brett Lewinski wrote:Hello Bruce -

I have a little knowledge of Ruby and Scala; listening to talks and some self experimentation. I like how Scala removes some of the bloat form the source files and with Ruby I like the seamless use of MVC. I am interested in some of the other functional languages and learning what they have to offer. I am a big proponent of the right tool for the job. I work in a Java shop and at times it is difficult to introduce new technologies or languages to our team and environment. What advice can you give me to introduce some of these languages into my work place?

Thanks in advance!
Brett



Great question. I would definitely give Clojure a try. It's a great language for an environment with good Java developers who are looking for more power and good concurrency. After all, it's just byte code.

If you have developers who would struggle with Clojure, then I would definitely recommend Scala or Groovy (a language that's not in the book). Scala is the more performant of the two, and has functional aspects that can take your team to the next level, while staying true to Java's typing strategy and syntax. Groovy will let you build more dynamic applications. Think scripting.

Thanks again for this excellent question.
 
Brett Lewinski
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Bruce Thanks for the Reply I appreciate it!
 
Bruce Tate
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Brett Lewinski wrote:Bruce Thanks for the Reply I appreciate it!



My pleasure.
 
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