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Books on King Arthur for 10 Year Old

 
Gregg Bolinger
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My oldest son is 10 and has recently been asking for a good book on the legend of King Arthur. I told him I would do some research. So this is me doing research. Can anyone recommend a good book (series) for his age range? It's not so much the reading level, he reads at a 9th grade level (US Public School standards). I'm primarily concerned with content. I don't want him reading about Guinevere's ample bosom and such.
 
Paul Clapham
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The Once and Future King was the first thing which came to my mind. Although I'm not sure about your censorship requirements... it does necessarily get into seductions and affairs, but since it was written in the 1930's it certainly can't be all that racy.
 
Greg Charles
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"The Sword and the Stone", by T.H. White is probably more kid friendly. I don't remember the particulars of "The Once and Future King", but I've read extremely racy books written in the the 1930s and earlier. D.H. Lawrence anyone? Just because our parents and grandparents are old now, it doesn't mean they always were!
 
Paul Clapham
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It all depends on the kid. (I read all of Moby Dick to my son when he was younger than that.) And I doubt that something which was made into a Disney movie could be that "adult".
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Paul Clapham wrote:It all depends on the kid. (I read all of Moby Dick to my son when he was younger than that.) And I doubt that something which was made into a Disney movie could be that "adult".


But would you read him a book called "Moby's Dick" ? The thing is, there is 1 Moby Dick book. There are hundreds of variations of King Arthur. I just want to get one that doesn't focus on the love affair between Guinevere and Lancelot. And if that is unavoidable, then I want something pretty tame.
 
Greg Charles
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Hmmph, after some research, I have found that "The Sword and the Stone" is just part one of "The Once and Future King", so, by all means, go with that one. For some reason, I was conflating "TOaFK" with the one John Steinbeck wrote, but apparently that's called, "The Acts of King Arthur and His Noble Knights ". I remember liking that one, but I was probably fifteen or sixteen when I read it.
 
Paul Clapham
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I just had a thought, Gregg... do you have a public library where you live? If you do, there's a good chance it should have that book and a lot of similar ones. You could go in and check them out for yourself, or you could even ask one of the librarians that question? They love to get kids reading.
 
W. Joe Smith
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I recently read the Once and Future King. The first half, concerning the sword in the stone up to when he becomes king (SPOILER ALERT!), I think would be fine for a 10 year old. The second half....well, I'm not sure. It was explicit by any means, but there is talk about how Lancelot and Gueniveir (can't remember the spelling) fall in love, and there is some pretty well described fight scenes. I guess I would recommend reading through it yourself before reading it to/letting a child read it. I really liked the book, but my first experience with it was when i was a senior in high school.
 
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