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WebSphere platform - Does anybody use it?

 
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Hi all, do/did you use Websphere plataform in any project?
 
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yes.
 
André Asantos
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However it it a good investment for the resume?
 
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WebSphere is IBM's Java EE application server implementation. Yes, there are many people, and many companies, who use this.

However, WebSphere is not one of the "leading edge" Java EE application servers. It's always at least one version of the Java EE standard behind other app servers. If I'd want to learn Java EE, I'd start with Glassfish, which is Oracle's open source reference implementation for Java EE. It implements the latest standard and works really well. When you use the NetBeans IDE, you can get Glassfish with it set up and ready to go.
 
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WebSphere is also an umbrella name for a large product line at IBM -- so when someone asks about WebSphere I always ask for clarification.

Henry
 
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Jesper de Jong wrote:WebSphere is IBM's Java EE application server implementation. Yes, there are many people, and many companies, who use this.

However, WebSphere is not one of the "leading edge" Java EE application servers. It's always at least one version of the Java EE standard behind other app servers. If I'd want to learn Java EE, I'd start with Glassfish, which is Oracle's open source reference implementation for Java EE. It implements the latest standard and works really well. When you use the NetBeans IDE, you can get Glassfish with it set up and ready to go.



I believe that Websphere is indeed the leading edge technology. I mean look at the products they have. Websphere Application server, Websphere portal server, Websphere process server, Websphere MQ, Websphere Datapower and much more. I would accept if one says, Websphere is not the "easy to use" application servers and one can go for other app servers to learn the basics first. Websphere provides flexible integration across different products and security and different features which are worth the investment for large firms having long term benefits in mind.
 
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Sripathi Krishnamurthy wrote:I believe that Websphere is indeed the leading edge technology.


I think he meant in terms of the implementation of JEE standards. For instance, do they have a non-beta JEE6 application server yet? If they do, it was still some time after the likes of Glassfish.
 
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IMHO how close an application server follows new specifications depends on its intended audience and usage pattern.

Following the specifications more closely means more frequent major releases (as major specifications get updated). This is generally bad news at an enterprise setting because it in turn means that you have to upgrade your installations more frequently, due to more frequent product version sunsets (end-of-support). As far as I can tell from my own experience, I've seen many enterprise customers not updating spec levels even if servers are getting updated; for example they upgraded to WebSphere6/7 from WebSphere5 but did not migrate their code from JavaEE 1.4 to EE5; so most are not so keen about spec levels. At sum, if you want to educate yourself on latest spec levels, use a server that acts as reference implementation. If you will run it in your company, use WebSphere

IBM also recently extended it's product packaging with 'feature packs', to cater better to customers wishing to work on newer spec levels. Below is a quote from their website.

http://www-01.ibm.com/software/webservers/appserv/was/featurepacks/

IBM is simplifying the way you consume WebSphere Application Server with Feature Packs. In order to balance our customers’ desire for less frequent releases while still making available the latest standards to our customers who need them, IBM has introduced Feature Packs. With Feature Packs, customers can selectively take advantage of new standards and features while maintaining a more stable internal release cycle. IBM offers Feature Packs generally available or available in either open alpha, beta or technology preview.

 
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André Asantos wrote:Hi all, do/did you use Websphere plataform in any project?



It is an IBM's implementation of the JEE server. As such, many companies are using it, as part of their system which has a lot of other IBM products. It doesnt mean it is the best, but IBM's customer service is one that customers go for. The ide used with Websphere server, is also based on eclipse.

For a software developer, it is a good thing in the resume, but all other big servers are just the same (for the educated well-informed interviewer/employer). It is because, they are all mere implementations of the same specifications. With regards to proprietary features, I think glassfish and all other commercial-grade servers, has similar attractive features.

Many government institutions in my country is using Websphere server.
 
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i'm using WebSphere Application Server 6.1 and i'¿m going to use WAS 7.0

André Asantos wrote:Hi all, do/did you use Websphere plataform in any project?

 
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matias Yaryura wrote:i'm using WebSphere Application Server 6.1 and i'¿m going to use WAS 7.0


We're also using WebSphere 6.1 in the project for German telecom company. So, I'd be very glad to here from you about your migration experience in case you finally switch to WAS 7.
I totally agree with Jesus Angeles. Vendor-specific implementation of specs are not as important as high quality customer support and nice integration with other products.
However, for my own projects I'd probably choose Glassfish because it's open source and more popular among Java community. But it's definitely a good investment into your resume, if you have experience with WebSphere products.
 
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