Win a copy of OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 11 Developer Practice Tests this week in the OCP forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
programming forums Java Mobile Certification Databases Caching Books Engineering Micro Controllers OS Languages Paradigms IDEs Build Tools Frameworks Application Servers Open Source This Site Careers Other all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
Marshals:
  • Campbell Ritchie
  • Paul Clapham
  • Jeanne Boyarsky
  • Ron McLeod
  • Tim Cooke
Sheriffs:
  • Devaka Cooray
  • paul wheaton
  • Mark Herschberg
Saloon Keepers:
  • Tim Moores
  • Tim Holloway
  • Stephan van Hulst
  • Frits Walraven
  • Jj Roberts
Bartenders:
  • Carey Brown
  • salvin francis
  • Piet Souris

Learning chords for Guitar(that is Changing them at some short intervals) is really difficult

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 1087
Java Windows
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Learning chords(that is Changing them at some short intervals) is really difficult..Can anybody please suggest how to improvise on it on a short duration.. I learnt some tabs but it took me a day to byheart it (was repeating the same song)
 
Rancher
Posts: 4686
7
Mac OS X VI Editor Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Learning chords, and how to do a chord progression is what you have to do to learn to play the guitar. Practice. Practice, practice.

Do some simple rock-n-roll songs, many of them are three chord progressions. Learn the three, switch between them, and sing along.
Then add a fourth chord and you can then play 80% of all rock and roll.
 
lowercase baba
Posts: 12963
66
Chrome Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am not a guitar player, but I believe for many chords, there are two forms - an open form, and a barre form. in the open form, you finger some subset of the strings, so when you strum a few play their un-fretted note. These forms are easier to do, but hard to change from one to another.

In a barre chord, your index finger lays across all six string, and your other three finger specific strings. You can do this at any spot on the neck, so a C9 can easily be changed to a D9 with almost no effort.

Penn Jillette (of Penn & Teller) once said that the secret to being good at something is to put in more time than anyone else could possibly think it is worth. He was referring to magic tricks, but the same is really true for magic, basketball, golf, guitar, piano, oragami, etc.
 
High Plains Drifter
Posts: 7289
Netbeans IDE VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've been at it with the guitar, on and off, for several years. It is entirely about putting in the hours. Some people "get it" faster -- like everyone else I know -- but no one says they picked it up quickly. I think the real difference is that they minded a lot less the time required to play more easily.

I tried outsmarting my guitar once, no luck.
 
Pat Farrell
Rancher
Posts: 4686
7
Mac OS X VI Editor Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

fred rosenberger wrote: These forms are easier to do, but hard to change from one to another.

... was referring to magic tricks, but the same is really true for magic, basketball, golf, guitar, piano, oragami, etc.



In one of the classic Beatles songs, John and Paul refer to "He knows all the chords", meaning that George knew not only the standard fingering for the chord, or the standard barre form, but he knew the many alternative fingerings, minor and augmented versions, etc. Many rock and roll songs can be played with only 3 or 4 songs.

Its simply practice. You have to build up finger strength and flexibility, and you need to develop calluses on your fingertips. A half hour a day for a few months is usually enough to get to where you can play and sing along with the classic by The Byrds: "So You Want To Be A Rock N Roll Star"

So you want to be a rock n roll star then listen now to what I say
Just get an electric guitar and take some time to learn how to play
 
Rancher
Posts: 3742
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pat Farrell wrote:In one of the classic Beatles songs, John and Paul refer to "He knows all the chords"



Are you sure you're not thinking of Sultans of Swing by Dire Straits. "Guitar George, he knows all the chords, but he's strictly rhythm, he doesn't want to make it cry or sing."
 
Pat Farrell
Rancher
Posts: 4686
7
Mac OS X VI Editor Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joanne Neal wrote:by Dire Straits. "Guitar George, he knows all the chords, but he's strictly rhythm, he doesn't want to make it cry or sing."


Wow, that could be it, or it might have been a shoutout by Dire Straits. Obviously, George H made it gently weep more than once.
 
Joanne Neal
Rancher
Posts: 3742
16
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I think it's probably a different George in the song unless the Beatles had a Harry in one of their early line ups.

Pat Farrell wrote:George H made it gently weep more than once.

But ironically, not on When My Guitar Gently Weeps
 
clojure forum advocate
Posts: 3479
Mac Objective C Clojure
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
How many hours you are doing every day/week? How do you partition your practicing session?
 
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Mac Safari Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joanne Neal wrote:... Sultans of Swing by Dire Straits...


That's the song that inspired me to play guitar in 1979. It changed my life.
 
marc weber
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Mac Safari Java
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I taught guitar for 6 years. Without hearing and seeing what you're doing, I can't offer much specific. But I will share 2 big keys (no pun intended) for fast chord changes.

First, relax. Too many beginners approach fingering a chord the way a bodybuilder strikes a pose. If you want to be fast and fluid, you need to loosen up. This isn't just in your hand. It often starts at your shoulder, then your arm, your wrist, your fingers... Do not muscle the guitar. Apply only as much pressure as you need.

Second, slow down! Too many beginners play quickly, then need to pause for a chord change, then play quickly, then need to pause for a chord change... That erratic starting and stopping is not helping you. In fact, it's going to kill your sense of rhythm. A song is not snapshots -- it's one continuous, fluid movie. So the important thing is consistent tempo. Slow it down until you're not pausing for chord changes. If that means slowing a 120 beats per minute song down to 40, then do it. I don't care how slow you need to go, just maintain that consistent tempo. Once you're able to do this, then gradually speed up.

(I'm just guessing, but... Chances are your wrist is behind the neck. Move it below the neck, so your fingers have room to arch. Also, your elbow is probably too close to your body, and that's putting a weird angle on your wrist.)
 
Pat Farrell
Rancher
Posts: 4686
7
Mac OS X VI Editor Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

marc weber wrote:Too many beginners approach fingering a chord the way a bodybuilder strikes a pose. If you want to be fast and fluid, you need to loosen up.
(I'm just guessing, but... Chances are your wrist is behind the neck. Move it below the neck, so your fingers have room to arch. Also, your elbow is probably too close to your body, and that's putting a weird angle on your wrist.)



Nearly all guitar teachers teach (I'll give @marc time to correct me if I'm wrong) that you put your thumb in the middle of the back of the neck. It feels weird at first, and is how how you see the famous rock stars play, but do it anyway. After a bit of practice, it helps you arch your fingers into proper shape, and its a lot easier to control pressure by squeezing between your thumb and fingers.

Also, have your guitar teacher check the setup of your guitar. Lots of inexpensive "student" guitars are badly setup, and have the strings far too high off of the frets -- requiring that you move the string a long way to make the chord. And too many have way too much tension, so it feels like you are trying to make a chord out of the cables of the Golden Gate Bridge. A properly setup guitar is tons easier to play than most "student" guitars.
 
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Posts: 12963
66
Chrome Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pat Farrell wrote: A properly setup guitar is tons easier to play than most "student" guitars.


Isn't it like calculus? You have to learn the hard way to do a derivative before the easy way?
 
marc weber
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Mac Safari Java
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pat Farrell wrote:... Nearly all guitar teachers teach (I'll give @marc time to correct me if I'm wrong) that you put your thumb in the middle of the back of the neck. It feels weird at first, and is how how you see the famous rock stars play, but do it anyway. After a bit of practice, it helps you arch your fingers into proper shape, and its a lot easier to control pressure by squeezing between your thumb and fingers.

Also, have your guitar teacher check the setup of your guitar. Lots of inexpensive "student" guitars are badly setup, and have the strings far too high off of the frets -- requiring that you move the string a long way to make the chord. And too many have way too much tension, so it feels like you are trying to make a chord out of the cables of the Golden Gate Bridge. A properly setup guitar is tons easier to play than most "student" guitars.


Quite right on both counts!

Do not grab the neck tightly like a tennis racquet. As Pat said, put your thumb in the middle of the back of the neck, with your wrist underneath (not behind) the neck, and let your fingers arch so the tips are nearly perpendicular to the fingerboard. (There are exceptions with certain fingerings, but don't make it a habit.) Yes, this will feel weird at first, but don't tense up like a vice. This is where you really need to concentrate on relaxing as much as possible -- apply only as much pressure as needed.

Thankfully, "student" guitars have improved tremendously since I started in '79. Back then, an entry-level electric was typically a marginal knock-off of a Strat or Les Paul made by companies like Hondo or Grande. These guitars couldn't stay in tune (for a variety of reasons, not easily fixed) and sounded terrible (with the bad kind of feedback at higher volumes). And they weren't cheap either! With inflation, $200 in 1979 is equivalent to over $600 today, which can buy you a professional-grade Mexican Strat with change left over. Today, you can even get a Squire Strat for about $120 (which is less than $40 in 1979 dollars), and they are amazingly good for the money.

(Ref: CPI Inflation Calculator.)
 
marc weber
Sheriff
Posts: 11343
Mac Safari Java
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
In March of 1982, another player shared some advice that I've followed ever since: Use Dunlop nylon picks.
 
Bartender
Posts: 2407
36
Scala Python Oracle Postgres Database Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Pat Farrell wrote:
Nearly all guitar teachers teach (I'll give @marc time to correct me if I'm wrong) that you put your thumb in the middle of the back of the neck. It feels weird at first, and is how how you see the famous rock stars play, but do it anyway. After a bit of practice, it helps you arch your fingers into proper shape, and its a lot easier to control pressure by squeezing between your thumb and fingers.



Thanks for the tip - makes a real difference. As a middle-aged bloke trying (yet again) to pick up some easy tunes on the guitar (without actually paying a proper teacher for lessons), those few lines will definitely make my chord-changes little bit easier!

 
Hussein Baghdadi
clojure forum advocate
Posts: 3479
Mac Objective C Clojure
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

fred rosenberger wrote:

Pat Farrell wrote: A properly setup guitar is tons easier to play than most "student" guitars.


Isn't it like calculus? You have to learn the hard way to do a derivative before the easy way?


No I don't think so.
You should start very slowly, patiently and simple. Learning guitar is frustrating enough (especially at the beginning, the first two years) .
Throwing challenging techniques for the right hand (like tremolo or rasgueado) or complex left hand movements is simply devastating.
Some techniques take years to do cleanly and beautifully.
IMHO, guitar is a versatile instrument but one of most difficult and challenging instruments to master and to unleash.
 
fred rosenberger
lowercase baba
Posts: 12963
66
Chrome Java Linux
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

John Todd wrote:No I don't think so.


I was trying (and apparently failing) to be humorous.

 
Hussein Baghdadi
clojure forum advocate
Posts: 3479
Mac Objective C Clojure
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

fred rosenberger wrote:

John Todd wrote:No I don't think so.


I was trying (and apparently failing) to be humorous.


Ah, sorry didn't notice
Maybe I didn't notice because I had/am suffering a lot with the guitar.
 
author
Posts: 9014
20
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
A couple more ideas:

- Lots of short practice sessions each week is better than one or two long ones. Even 10 minutes a day makes a huge difference.

- If you're on a budget, a $100 nylon string guitar will be a TON easier to learn on than a $100 steel string guitar.

- Make a list of specific things you will learn. A new scale each month, or a new chord each week, then actually work through your list and keep adding new stuff to it.

So as not to hijack this thread, I'll start on new thread on Keith Richards' book: "Life"
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 25
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
For starters, you can start with A, D and E chords. Try practicing progressing between different sets. Smooth chord progression is something that can only be acquired by practice..

I also firmly believe that the best way to learn new chords and progression is by playing some tunes. You can start playing some AC/DC for now.
Add on a G chord and you can go for something like 'Highway to Hell"..Uses A, D and G chords for the intro..
"TNT" also uses a similart chord pattern IIRC..
Add on a C and you are good for "You shook me all night long"

Good luck..
 
Switching from electric heat to a rocket mass heater reduces your carbon footprint as much as parking 7 cars. Tiny ad:
the value of filler advertising in 2021
https://coderanch.com/t/730886/filler-advertising
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic