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Your Story from being a Novice Programmer to an Expert Prgrammer

 
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Hi Ranchers,

Please share your story with respect to the above topic..how much time does it takes to be an expert
the thrills and chills you faced during this phase
 
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My lucky journey begun ever since I stumble on this website and continue evolving as a better programmer and better human kind. Seriously.
 
Marshal
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Mine.
 
Bartender
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Nice resume Bear
 
Vishal Hegde
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Bear Bibeault wrote:Mine.



Hi Bear,

Wow, you must be Director or VP by now. I am just a little Curious, what was your first Job profile? and when did you wrote your first Book, what were the challenged you faced while writing
 
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The question "how much time does it take to become an expert" is hard to answer in a general way, because it depends on a lot of factors. Some people learn quicker than others. It also depends on what exactly the subject is.

I started programming when I was 13, when I got my first computer, a Commodore 64. We got a manual with it that explained how to program in BASIC. I remember sitting together with my dad, programming sprites (the video chip of the Commodore 64 has hardware support for sprites). After a while I started programming on it in assembly language and I knew the whole computer inside out.

After the Commodore 64, we had an Amiga 2000. I bought the Aztec C compiler for it and started learning programming in C. After that, I had a PC (a 386SX, 20 MHz, with 1 MB RAM and 60 MB harddisk - yes, those are megabytes, not gigabytes) with Windows 3.1. I bought Symantec C++ for it and started learning C++ and the Windows API.

I started working as a professional software developer in 1996, programming in C++. Around 1998 there was this cool new thing called Java and together with a colleague we started playing with this. We made a chess playing applet that we demonstrated to the rest of our company.

About a year later the Java ball really started rolling and we got our first Java development projects. I did a J2EE course and started on one of our first J2EE projects, which was a web application with BEA WebLogic 5.1.

I learned most of what I know about Java by experience. Playing with new technology, creating personal toy projects and see how it all works by doing it yourself is the best way to learn things.
 
Vishal Hegde
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Jesper de Jong wrote:The question "how much time does it take to become an expert" is hard to answer in a general way, because it depends on a lot of factors. Some people learn quicker than others. It also depends on what exactly the subject is.

I started programming when I was 13, when I got my first computer, a Commodore 64. We got a manual with it that explained how to program in BASIC. I remember sitting together with my dad, programming sprites (the video chip of the Commodore 64 has hardware support for sprites). After a while I started programming on it in assembly language and I knew the whole computer inside out.

After the Commodore 64, we had an Amiga 2000. I bought the Aztec C compiler for it and started learning programming in C. After that, I had a PC (a 386SX, 20 MHz, with 1 MB RAM and 60 MB harddisk - yes, those are megabytes, not gigabytes) with Windows 3.1. I bought Symantec C++ for it and started learning C++ and the Windows API.

I started working as a professional software developer in 1996, programming in C++. Around 1998 there was this cool new thing called Java and together with a colleague we started playing with this. We made a chess playing applet that we demonstrated to the rest of our company.

About a year later the Java ball really started rolling and we got our first Java development projects. I did a J2EE course and started on one of our first J2EE projects, which was a web application with BEA WebLogic 5.1.

I learned most of what I know about Java by experience. Playing with new technology, creating personal toy projects and see how it all works by doing it yourself is the best way to learn things.



Hi Jesper,

I read your story in top contributors of Javaranch, liked the pic too
 
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A lot of people who study expertise are starting to agree that it takes 10,000 hours of *deliberate practice* to become an expert in a given domain. This doesn't mean that if you've had a full time job (2000 / yr), for 5 years, that you're an expert.

The problem that most people have is that they learn some stuff in the beginning, then they keep repeating it. So, 1000 hours, repeated 10 times does not make you an expert!

*Deliberate practice* means to constantly be learning new things, pushing your boundaries, pushing your comfort zone, having a plan, taking lessons of some sort, and so on. Experts typically have lists of things to learn, and are constantly learning new stuff, crossing that stuff off of their list, and then adding more new stuff to learn.

Based on that criteria my story is:

1 - Wrote code and designed software for 20 years - only did *deliberate practice* occasionally.
2 - Been writing books and doing developmental editing for 8 years - some *deliberate practice*.
3 - So, I'm still not an expert in either of those domains.
 
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I was born an expert. No journey required.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Vishal Hegde wrote:Wow, you must be Director or VP by now.


Been there, done that. Didn't like it much. I'm happy just being an architect for now.

I am just a little Curious, what was your first Job profile?


My first job was building kitchen countertops.

My first "real" job (as in within the computer industry) was with Digital Equipment writing memory diagnostics for the PDP 11/44.

and when did you wrote your first Book, what were the challenged you faced while writing


I worked on the Prototype book and Ajax in Practice simultaneously as my first foray into book authoring. I found writing rather easy -- indexing is hard!
 
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Bert Bates wrote:... The problem that most people have is that they learn some stuff in the beginning, then they keep repeating it. So, 1000 hours, repeated 10 times does not make you an expert! ...


Wow, there's some perspective!
 
marc weber
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I'm really good at some stuff, pretty good at other stuff... But I'll post back when I'm an "expert."
 
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hI all,


Me no expert programmer at all. Work in a bpo as a network support, but really want to be a software professional some day. I got some knowledge abou java, and hopefully this april will finish my SCJP 1.6!!......

In between am working on my own initiative to try and automate the entire network support and maintenance facility through java. Although i dont have the slightest clue how to go about with it, still giving it a try. Hope that it helps me take my first step in becoming a netwrok professional!!!....
 
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Bert Bates wrote:So, 1000 hours, repeated 10 times does not make you an expert!


I had a boss about 30 years ago who stressed this idea when we were interviewing new hires. His key question was does the candidate have ten years of progressive experience, or one year done over ten times.

I started to feel, and perhaps be, an expert in one kind of programming on one operating system after I had been out of the university for 6 or so years. I worked as a professional programmer while I was still working on my undergraduate degree, so I probably had 7 or more years of professional work feeding my self by being a programmer.

After the first set of language/operating system, becoming expert level in the second was faster, but still took many years.

These days, the technologies are so complex, I don't think anyone can become an expert in something as broad as all of how Java is deployed in large scale commercial web application. Java itself is simple, JEE is hard, ORM is hard, performance is hard, proper parallel (threading) is hard, good UI building is hard, etc. combined I don't think anyone has an end-to-end "expert" rating.

I do believe that using several languages and several operating environments is critical to a well rounded understanding. Especially if they are orthogonal, such as Java vs Smalltalk, or even OS-X and Windows 7 (Android and IOS?).

 
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