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Spring Controllers singleton or not?

 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 117
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Hi All,
I know that spring beans are singleton by default. I want to know whether Spring controllers are singleton or a new instance is created for each user?
 
ranger
Posts: 17347
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Mac IntelliJ IDE Spring
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Still a singleton, and proud of it. ;)

Mark
 
Greenhorn
Posts: 7
Eclipse IDE Spring Linux
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Hi Fawad Ali,

By default it always singleton.

There are many ways to check your bean is singleton or not. For your confirmation if you want to check just create a Standalone application and load your configuration file from BeanFactory or ApplicationContext thn get your bean more thn one time using getBean() method.

And finally print object and check the address of that objects.It should be same. For example you can see below code in main method....


Resource resource = new FileSystemResource("com/spring/example/spring.cfg.xml");
BeanFactory factory = new XmlBeanFactory(resource);

Singleton singleton = (Singleton) factory.getBean("singleton");

Singleton singleton1 = (Singleton) factory.getBean("singleton");

System.out.println("Address 1=>"+singleton);
System.out.println("Address 2=>"+singleton1);

xml file has...

<bean id="singleton" class="com.example.Singleton">
</bean>
 
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