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Got certified today with a fair score 81%

 
Yea Mua
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Everything went pretty well today, seated myself in the room, got 2 erasable paper, and finished the exam before time up. There is not too much left in memory that how the exam went on. I thought it was just another mock exams, and a short and nice moment in 4 months' preparation. 81% passing score doesn't sparkle, but something from my experience will, at least that is what I think. Let me lay a new brick on the wall so that the follower can stand higher.

I started my preparation from reading K&B's Headfirst Java. Before that, I just have had two academic projects with less than thousand lines' Java experience. It may sound not too little, but that code is built by googling + modifying examples. Soon to work, soon to forget. Back to the topic, I read that book almost twice within 2 months. It is well designed for actual beginners, with more vivid illustration and incise explanation than their SCJP 6 guidance book, which is too objectives-focused and neglect some details. So if you have adequate time and would like to lay a solid foundation for future work, I strongly recommend you start your preparation from Headfirst Java.

After finishing Headfirst Java, you should already be a qualified Java programmer, gone over each important topic even if which is not included in the exam, such as Interface(SWING) Design, Networking, Distributed Computing and so on. But for the tricky questions appeared in OCPJP 6 exam, that is not enough or say not so targeted. So the second book I used and recommend is their well-known exam guidance book for SCJP 6. When read on it, you will feel some of its chapters are too much words as you have got the idea from Headfirst Java. So you could skip reading it and just grab the vivid explanation from Headfirst Java. I took around 5 weeks completing this stage. (weekday nights + weekend). Do remember taking the quiz section after each chapter and digest them. It helps you really understand what they were trying to convey.

Later on I used about 3 weeks on mock exams. Here are the details:

Two from K&B guidance book's CD: tough and detailed. Do remember save your test after finishing. I forgot it and just kept a score so that have to take the same exam twice...

One exam from Inquisition(http://enigma.vm.bytemark.co.uk/webstart.html) : same level as K&B, but different flavor, and with a beautiful interface.

Topic-based question set from Javachamp(http://www.javachamp.com/public/channelsPage.xhtml): moderate difficulty as real exam

One exam from ExamLab: same or a little more difficult than K&B which I do not recommend spending too much time on it. I just picked one from five exams. Also, there is no saving function for this software, so keep in mind reading all answers&explanations after you finished it.

Two exams from Oracle: pre-assessment exam(http://www.oracle.com/webapps/dialogue/dlgpage.jsp) & practice sample exam (sent after you register the exam before Sept. 2011). The former contains a certain amount of tough&tricky questions, but as they are labeled Oracle, it worth the time and at least you will grasp the main point of each topic. The second one is what I recommend most strongly. I could NOT tell the difference between it and the real exam in terms of difficulty, interface and everything. You should simulate the real exam condition to take it, and you will feel much more conformable after you see the real one. I got 77% on that one and my final score is 81%.

Note: Do digest each wrong question carefully and thoroughly after each exam/quiz, make a note or better a summary so that you won't fall again by the same stone.

Last but not least, when you are struggling in one question, come here and seek help, it is not just for an answer, but for the confidence and courage to keep moving forward.

Hope this helps for those who happen to stop by this post.


Good luck!











 
gaurav gupta sitm
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hey congrats ,
Please can you send me that practice sample exam
i have not recieved practice sample exam from oracle through email and my exam is after 3 days
my email id [Email address removed]
Thanks....
 
ravisankar sankar
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Hello Yea Mua ,

Congrats many, you please tell me Generics and garbage collection how was the questions?
 
Paul Anilprem
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Congratulations!!
 
Yea Mua
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gaurav gupta sitm wrote:hey congrats ,
Please can you send me that practice sample exam
i have not recieved practice sample exam from oracle through email and my exam is after 3 days
my email id [email address removed]
Thanks....


Hi Gaurav,

You should receive their email within one week after you register. It is an online practice exam so I do not have any local copy. You can try to contact Oracle to speed up its process or just purchase one in $32. However, you may also try your luck to follow these steps (in Oracle's email) to see if could take it immediately:

1. Go to www.pearsonvue.com/oracle/
2. Choose the “Schedule a Test” button on the right side of your screen
3. Select PRACTICE QUESTIONS under “What type of exam are you planning to take?”
4. Log in and select SAMPLE-8xx (PRACTICE QUESTIONS) near the end of the Exam Code/Exam Name list and click “Next”
5. Enter your voucher number and click “Apply Voucher”
6. Click the “Next” button

Good luck!
 
Yea Mua
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Hi Ravisankar,

Generics is quite popular topic, but all based on collections, not that hard if you have done several exam I have mentioned. Garbage collection has one or two questions, regarding finalize() method.

Hope this helps.

ravisankar sankar wrote:Hello Yea Mua ,

Congrats many, you please tell me Generics and garbage collection how was the questions?
 
Teja Bhaai
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Thanks for taking so much time to share your way to success. And congrats for the Success.

Teja
 
Joe Harry
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Congratulations!
 
ravisankar sankar
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thanks Yea Mua for your valuable suggestions.

 
arulk pillai
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Congrats, and keep up the good work
 
Dharmenrda kumar
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Congrates
 
Yea Mua
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Thank you all, folks.

I thought I forget to share a check-list which could be quite helpful dealing with each question. It is revised based on another post in this forum.

When we worn out in a 2.5 hours exam, it is quite usually that our brain is temporarily short-circuit so that we take one aspect into consideration but neglect another, especially when some trick questions intend to induce you to a wrong aspect. For example, a question seems to test join() functionality but actually missing exception handling or a question that does a reasonable serialize/deserialize operations but a function does not have return type. So a common pitfall's checklist to the rescue!

Before you start an exam (mock or real), write down this list below onto a white paper. Then examine each question first with this list which will make sure you won't fall with these usual tricks!

Pitfalls check list:

1. Syntax (such as missing parenthesis)
2. Modifier (access & non-access), return type, variable scoping.
3. Exception (missing or misused)
4. Static & non-static cross-reference
5. Code logic


Hope this make life easier.
 
With a little knowledge, a cast iron skillet is non-stick and lasts a lifetime.
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