• Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

A Project Dilemma

 
Alan Blass
Ranch Hand
Posts: 158
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi!

I work for a small company with about 15 programmers for about one year now.

Recently, the CEO wanted a web application which is able to upload videos to social media website such as youtube, etc.

But my immediate project manager says we have no time to do that. He said he has agreed to the CEO to let me do the web application but since the CEO did not specify a deadline, my project manager has simply shoved it under the carpet. He did not allocate time resources for me to do it.

In an recent email, the CEO has indicated this web application has got great importance in the future of our company. Having gotten a pay rise this month, I feel obliged to do the web application but I have 2 other web applications on hand and the schedule is very tight.

I feel that this web application is like a ticking time bomb. The project manager has ignored the project but the CEO has placed high hopes on it.

What should I do?
 
Himanshu Gupta
Ranch Hand
Posts: 598
Android Eclipse IDE Ubuntu
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Do it in your spare time. Its only a month. Tell them that you like this project and get your CEO attention. Opportunity never knocks twice.
 
Campbell Ritchie
Sheriff
Pie
Posts: 50278
80
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Himanshu Gupta wrote:Do it in your spare time. . . .
. . . and sell it back to the company? If you really did it in your "spare time", and on your own PC, you would be entitled to sell it back, since it wouldn't actually belong to your employer.

I would suggest, maybe, you find a disinterested manager to discuss the problem quietly with, in the first instance. Make sure to keep the discussion secret, so you won't get into any trouble.
 
Paul Clapham
Sheriff
Posts: 21416
33
Eclipse IDE Firefox Browser MySQL Database
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
So you believe that at some point there will be a major conflict between the CEO and the project manager over this issue? That's certainly possible. But what exactly is your concern? That you will be made the scapegoat? Or that the company will suffer because of this conflict?

I don't have any advice for you in either case, and I would second Campbell's suggestion to discuss the issue with somebody in your company who would know the parties involved and have some idea of what might happen. I'm just suggesting that you should be clear in your mind about what are the risks you're concerned about. And whose risks they are.
 
Deepak Bala
Bartender
Posts: 6663
5
Firefox Browser Linux MyEclipse IDE
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
And whose risks they are.


Nailed it
 
Jimmy Clark
Ranch Hand
Posts: 2187
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I feel that this web application is like a ticking time bomb. The project manager has ignored the project but the CEO has placed high hopes on it.

What should I do?


You should share and discuss your feelings with your immediate manager. If your manager is the Porject Manager, then this is the person to speak to. Your assumption that this is being ignored by the Project Manager may not be accurate. He/She most likely has much more information about the organization's plans and priorities.

Since this is a small company, I would imagine that there may be a few occasions when you can speak directly with the CEO. In a non-aggressive way, you should bring up the topic and share your eagerness.

Speaking behind-the-scenes with another manager or anyone else really is not a good idea. Your manager is your key to prosperity and you certainly do not want to soil this relationship.

Good luck!
 
Luke Kolin
Ranch Hand
Posts: 343
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jimmy Clark wrote:Your assumption that this is being ignored by the Project Manager may not be accurate. He/She most likely has much more information about the organization's plans and priorities.


I would argue that this applies to the Project Manager as well. If the CEO has indicated that he considers it a priority and your boss doesn't, then one should raise their concerns with your manager and then find a way to discreetly communicate the present lack of action upwards.

Speaking behind-the-scenes with another manager or anyone else really is not a good idea. Your manager is your key to prosperity and you certainly do not want to soil this relationship.


If my boss was in direct conflict with the CEO, I don't consider my boss to be a long-term factor in my employment. ;)

Cheers!

Luke
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal
Posts: 34974
379
Eclipse IDE Java VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't think asking another person for advice is a bad idea. Sometimes another person who knows the parties will sense a key fact you are missing. It's not like you are telling on the PM; just asking for advice.

I also wonder which app is a priority. Executives think long term. Just because something has a long term future doesn't necessarily make it a short term priority.
 
Luke Kolin
Ranch Hand
Posts: 343
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Jeanne Boyarsky wrote:Executives think long term.


One hopes, but one should never assume.

Cheers!

Luke
 
  • Post Reply
  • Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic