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'==' operatot behaving different for 1000 and 10.

 
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I got confused in the following code where it shows (i3==i4) but Not the same with (i2==i4).
Why this code behaves differently. Here's the code

Output :Same Object-I



Kindly clear this doubt. I shall be very thankfull to u.
 
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Hi Austin,

If you create the integer like



It creates the integer object by auto boxing.When you create the Integer from -128 to 127 by using the above syntax, it creates the object in the constant pool like create the string in string literal pool.
If you create the Integer with the value more than 127,it creates the object in the heap.So at the time of check equality using == it returns false.

The above rule is applicable for Byte and Short also.But not applicable for Float and Double.

 
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No, that's not correct. There's no 'constant pool' for Integers. Autoboxing uses values cached by the Integer class.

The behavior is as mandated by the JLS.
http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/conversions.html#190730
If the value p being boxed is true, false, a byte, a char in the range \u0000 to \u007f, or an int or short number between -128 and 127, then let r1 and r2 be the results of any two boxing conversions of p. It is always the case that r1 == r2.
 
Catherine austin
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Thanks Muneeswaran and Darryl But Darryl can you explain me the real cause of this absurd behaviour . Since my exam is next weak i need to know all possible answers .
 
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Catherine austin wrote:Thanks Muneeswaran and Darryl But Darryl can you explain me the real cause of this absurd behaviour . Since my exam is next weak i need to know all possible answers .



His post has the real cause of the absurd behavior. JLS mandates that if you have a boxing of an int or short between -128 to 127 then when evaluating == it is true.
 
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yes that's correct, JVM returns same object for integer range -128 to 127. you may find my blogpost What is the problem while using "==" in autoboxing world in Java 5 interesting.
 
Catherine austin
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Thanks Javin
 
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