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Java Certificaion Questions.

 
Greenhorn
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Hello:

I'm a mainframe COBOL programmer with a degree in computer science who worked in the life insurance industry for the last 12 years. I was laid off in May and I'd like to switch over to Java. I read teach yourself Java in 24 hours and understand the basics. I'd like to get certified and have some questions.

1. What is the best certification to get, or what do most employers look for?
2. What are some good books to use to learn Java?
3. What are some good boods to study for the Java certification tests?
4. Does anyone have any advice on switching from COBOL to Java and getting a job coding Java?

Thanks.
 
Bartender
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Steve Dessent wrote:Hello:

I'm a mainframe COBOL programmer with a degree in computer science who worked in the life insurance industry for the last 12 years. I was laid off in May and I'd like to switch over to Java. I read teach yourself Java in 24 hours and understand the basics.


May be before you start off reading Tech yourself in X hours, you must read this article by Peter Norvig.

Steve Dessent wrote:
1. What is the best certification to get, or what do most employers look for?


OCPJP. They are mixed feelings for the certification being given importance by the employers. But its good to have as you gain tremendous amount of knowledge while you prepare for it.
OCPJP is the new name for SCJP.

Steve Dessent wrote:
2. What are some good books to use to learn Java?


Head First Java for beginners.
Core Java by Coy Horstmann (2 volumes)- Lot of good and useful examples.
Effective Java by Joshua Bloch
Java Pitfalls (Co-authored by Joshua Bloch)

Steve Dessent wrote:
3. What are some good boods to study for the Java certification tests?


SCJP Guide by Kathy Seirra and Bert Bates.
SCJP(/OCPJP) practice exams.
 
Marshal
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I think this question would sit better on another forum. Moving. Let’s try the SCJP/OCPJP forum
 
Bartender
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I second the Core Java books - fantastic for learning and for future reference. The SCJP is definitely the one you want. Simply because you pick up the core aspects of the language away from IDEs and Frameworks.
 
Ranch Hand
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To learn Java I recommend:

SCJP Certification Exam Guide by Bates & Sierra. while not intended as an introduction to the language I still think it is effective in teaching you the fundamentals. I recommend this book whether you are pursuing certification or not. It does not show you how to set up your environment so you might possibly need help with that.

or, my second choice,

Head First Java from O'Reilly. A very readable basic introduction to the language.

Either way, do not use any IDE like NetBeans. An IDE will only hide from you certain things you need to learn, like classpaths and packages. Just install the jdk and use a text editor to write code. Invoke the compiler etc at the command line. The compiler is javac.exe, the runtime is java.exe.
 
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