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Any Advice on the Tricky Nature of the Questions?

 
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Hi,
I am using the SCJP Study Guide by Sierra & Bates. I feel I have a good grasp of each chapter until I do the self-tests. The questions are presented as brain-twister puzzles. I realize that this is how the questions are presented on the exam.

Does anyone have any tips or advice on how to step back and look at these problems, or break them down so that I have the best chance of understanding and solving them?

Thanks in advance,
-Russ
 
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Hi Russ,

I have some parts of an answer for you - I hope others will add more:

- We try to make the book about 115% as broad and challenging as the actual exam. So we try to cover a bit more and make the questions a bit tougher.
- Remember that on the real exam you'll know how many answers are correct for each question - that really helps!
- In the old days the exam was really "tricky", things like missing semi-colons. These days the exams try to test on real-world issues and common misunderstandings. We try to make the questions that way too, as much as we can.
- You'll want to establish a "hierarchy of tests" for yourself:
- are the static and instance components working correctly?
- are the key method signatures correct?
- are the access modifiers (implicit and explicit) correct?

and so on - checl for those things first before diving into the guts of the code.

hth,

Bert
 
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Hi,

Once you are done reading the book, try answering a lot of mock tests as possible. Try answering at least 20 questions a day(that is only if you are a working professional else you could do a lot more..). That would train your mind to easily spot the simple/common syntax errors before actually delving into the code. And plus learning by solving the mock questions is a lot more fun and would boost your confidence levels to take on the real exam.

Joseph Arnold
 
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Solving as many questions as you can is a very effective approach. But make sure you first read about the concepts thoroughly from a book.
And don't worry too much about it. Once you start solving the mocks, it will become a lot easier
 
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When you read a new chapter you don't really know what are the tricky parts of that chapter. The self test is the first time you realize how tricky questions can be made out of the topics of that chapter. By making the mistakes you get better so practice a lot
 
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Bert Bates wrote:Hi Russ,

- Remember that on the real exam you'll know how many answers are correct for each question - that really helps!
Bert



Do you mean that in a question with multiple answers they tell you exactly how many answers to choose?
 
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O. Ziggy wrote:Do you mean that in a question with multiple answers they tell you exactly how many answers to choose?


I think yes.
 
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Akhilesh Trivedi wrote:

O. Ziggy wrote:Do you mean that in a question with multiple answers they tell you exactly how many answers to choose?


I think yes.



That would really be useful. I know in the book it just says '"Choose more than one".
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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O. Ziggy wrote:I know in the book it just says '"Choose more than one".



In the same book, read Introduction section, part - "Question Format" - sub-heading Multiple Choice Question
 
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