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Unary boolean logical operator negation !  RSS feed

 
Melissa Nikolic
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Hi,

Some feedback regarding my misunderstanding is appreciated.

1) The following is what the Java docs says about boolean logical negation ! operator:

"The type of the operand expression of the unary ! operator must be boolean, or a compile-time error occurs. The type of the unary logical complement expression is boolean. At run time, the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true."
15.15.6 Logical Complement Operator !
http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/second_edition/html/expressions.doc.html

2) Example (answers given from my book):

boolean b1, b2, b3 = false, b4 = false;

b1 = (4==2) & (1<4) // false
b2 = b1 | !(2.5>=8) //true

3) Question:

Why is b2 true? My understanding is that the second operand has the value of true, because the truth value for a Boolean OR is "true if either or both operands are true, otherwise false" and !(2.5>=8) is true (unless it's not true and this is where my problem is). Therefore, since one of the operands is true then the complement expression should be false (unless I don't understand the idea of complement expressions), and b2 = b1 | !(2.5>=8) should be false.

Thank you for your assistance.

Regards,

M
 
Greg Brannon
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Booleans can get our brains twisted the more we think about them.

2.5 >= 8 is false. 2.5 is clearly NOT greater than or equal to 8.
!( false ) = true. obvious?

b2 = b1 || true
b1 = false. a given
b2 = false || true. If either this OR that is true, the result is true.
b2 = true.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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What complement operation? Complement is ~ and that can only be applied to integer numbers. You are negating a boolean value here, and have got an explanation already. Note the use of the | operator on booleans is often not optimal; || is often better.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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I see they are calling it complement. Still probably in accurate. Negation is better.
 
Winston Gutkowski
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:I see they are calling it complement. Still probably in accurate. Negation is better.

Personally, I like just calling it "not", especially for a boolean. 'Compliment' is somewhat vague, and in the context of '~', it's actually a 1s-compliment op.

Winston
 
Melissa Nikolic
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Greg Brannon wrote:Booleans can get our brains twisted the more we think about them.

2.5 >= 8 is false. 2.5 is clearly NOT greater than or equal to 8.
!( false ) = true. obvious?

b2 = b1 || true
b1 = false. a given
b2 = false || true. If either this OR that is true, the result is true.
b2 = true.


Thanks for your reply. I do get your explanation but I was confused by the documentation which said, " At run time, the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true". So, I thought the complement of the true value would be false (following my logic?).

I understand the example (re: why b2 is true) but what is the documentation referring to from the above quote?

Thanks again.

M
 
Melissa Nikolic
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Winston Gutkowski wrote:
Campbell Ritchie wrote:I see they are calling it complement. Still probably in accurate. Negation is better.

Personally, I like just calling it "not", especially for a boolean. 'Compliment' is somewhat vague, and in the context of '~', it's actually a 1s-compliment op.

Winston


In reference to the documentation, "The type of the operand expression of the unary ! operator must be boolean, or a compile-time error occurs. The type of the unary logical complement expression is boolean. At run time, the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true."

In this context "complement" means the "boolean logical operator negation" or '!' or "not"? So, what does it mean that "the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true". I was thinking that the complement of true is false and vice versa (hence my original confusion with the stated example).

Thank you,

M
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Melissa Nikolic wrote:
Thanks for your reply. I do get your explanation but I was confused by the documentation which said, " At run time, the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true". So, I thought the complement of the true value would be false (following my logic?).


It is. The logical or boolean complement of true is false.

I understand the example (re: why b2 is true) but what is the documentation referring to from the above quote?


It's saying that the value of the expression !X is the complement (the opposite) of the value of the expression X. That is, the expression which consists of operator ! and its operand X has the opposite value to what X has.



This is b2 = X | Y where Y is !Z and Z is (2.5 >= 8).

Thus, the value of the right hand operand of the | operator is true, because the ! gives us the complement of (2.5 >= 8), i.e., the complement of false, i.e. true.
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Melissa Nikolic wrote:
In this context "complement" means the "boolean logical operator negation" or '!' or "not"? So, what does it mean that "the value of the unary logical complement expression is true if the operand value is false and false if the operand value is true".


It means that if the value of the operand expression X is true, then the operator ! makes the value of the expression !X into false, and vice versa.

I was thinking that the complement of true is false and vice versa


Which is exactly correct when talking about booleans, which is what we are doing here.

I'm totally lost as to what you're confused about. The only think I can think of is that you took the documentation to mean that the expression X | !Y would have the opposite value to the expression X | Y because there happens to be a ! somewhere in the overall expression. That's not what the documentation is saying. The ! only negates its one operand--in this case, the Y. And X OR NOT Y is more definitely not the same as NOT(X OR Y).
 
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