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Eclipse version supports 1.4

 
Chandra Mohan
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Hi

I would like to run the java file using jdk 1.4 in Eclipse (Windows 64 bit). The current version eclipse won't support the jre 1.4. Where I can download the eclipse (Version # ?) which support 1.4 ver.

Regards
Mohan
 
Jesper de Jong
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The current version of Eclipse has to run on a newer Java version (I don't know if it must be at least 5 or 6, you can find that in the system requirements for Eclipse). But that does not mean that for running your applications, Eclipse does not support 1.4.

What you should do is install Java 6 or newer to run Eclipse on, and also install JDK 1.4. Then set Eclipse so that it will use this JDK 1.4 to run your program.

By the way, Java 1.4 is very old. Oracle does not support it anymore, unless you pay them for premium support. I'd advise you to upgrade to at least Java 6, if possible.
 
Chandra Mohan
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In my test server is running jre 1.4, I can't install latest version java also. The production code was running jdk 1.4 and have to fix some issues. For fix the issue, I need eclipse to install in that system. The latest version of eclipse expecting java 5 or higher version. The only option is I need to install the eclipse which supports java 1.4. Even eclipse web site I won't find older version.

Can i download any other place ??


 
Koen Aerts
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Can you find it here: http://archive.eclipse.org/eclipse/downloads/
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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You can also run Java 6 in Eclipse and set a target of 1.4. This isn't exactly the same as a real 1.4 (for example the enum keyword was fine in real 1.4) but is very convenient.
 
Chandra Mohan
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Thanks Koen.
 
Tim Holloway
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http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/index-jsp-138567.html

Not only is Java 1.4 not supported, Java 1.5 (Java 5) reached End of Life April 8, 2008 and Sun/Oracle cease all support November 3, 2009. Use these obsolete versions of Java at your own peril.

Since unlike a certain other popular provider of programming languages, Sun does not abruptly drop people off a cliff when they're tired of an old release of software, you can squeak by using the compatibility-level options on the JVM. However, nothing lasts forever, and the longer you put off upgrading the code, the more it's going to cost.

People like to use the phrase "If it aint Broke, don't fix it!" in IT, but they rarely stop to think that just because "it" ain't broke doesn't mean that resources critical to "it" haven't deteriorated. Software doesn't exist in isolation.
 
Wendy Gibbons
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Tim Holloway wrote:http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/index-jsp-138567.html

Not only is Java 1.4 not supported, Java 1.5 (Java 5) reached End of Life April 8, 2008 and Sun/Oracle cease all support November 3, 2009. Use these obsolete versions of Java at your own peril.

Since unlike a certain other popular provider of programming languages, Sun does not abruptly drop people off a cliff when they're tired of an old release of software, you can squeak by using the compatibility-level options on the JVM. However, nothing lasts forever, and the longer you put off upgrading the code, the more it's going to cost.

People like to use the phrase "If it aint Broke, don't fix it!" in IT, but they rarely stop to think that just because "it" ain't broke doesn't mean that resources critical to "it" haven't deteriorated. Software doesn't exist in isolation.


You talk as if developers have any control over the version of things like the JVM the customer is running. if you are writing software for large organisations they are impossible to shift, until you show them they have no choice, and something silly like there being no support, doesn't count the reply being "who needs support all the important bugs have been fixed by now"
 
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