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get numeric character representation for Polish unicode characters

 
Greenhorn
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HI,
Trying to get the numeric character representation of polish characters. Anyone knows how to do it?
INput - ĄĆĘŁŃÓŚŹŻąćęłńóśźż
Ouput shud be - 104 106 118 141 143 0D3 15A 179 17B 105 107 119 142 144 0F3 15B 17A 17C

- Sandy
 
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To convert a character to an int (which would be its Unicode codepoint) you just cast it:
 
sandy bose
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Nope this method does not work,
except Ó & ó; all other values are 63.
Ó = 211
ó = 243

-Sandy
 
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sandy bose wrote:Trying to get the numeric character representation of polish characters.


There is not one single numeric representation for characters. What numbers are used to represent specific characters is determined by a character encoding. There are a number of standard character encodings, for example ASCII, UTF-8, ISO-8859-1 etc.

What character encoding are you using?
 
sandy bose
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Does'nt the encoding depend on the characters in use?
anyway, do you have a code with the encodings you should say must be used {for polish characters}; which i can test?

-Sandip
 
Jesper de Jong
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No, the encoding does not depend on the characters in use. However, not all character encodings can encode all characters. ASCII for example is very limited, it doesn't have codes for many characters that are not plain letters.

Here's an example that gets the character codes for those letters when using the UTF-8 encoding.

This will not print the values that you expect, however. From your expected output I can't see what character encoding you're supposed to use.
 
Paul Clapham
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Jesper de Jong wrote:There is not one single numeric representation for characters.



Actually there is. It's called Unicode. Each character in Unicode corresponds to a number, which is called its "code point".

And what sandy originally posted matches Unicode... sort of. For example Ć is U+0106 and ż is U+017C. So my original post was incomplete; after casting the char to an int you would then have to format the int as a hexadecimal string using Integer.parseInt(xxx, 16).
 
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Jesper de Jong wrote:There is not one single numeric representation for characters.



Actually there is. It's called Unicode. Each character in Unicode corresponds to a number, which is called its "code point".

And what sandy originally posted matches Unicode... sort of. For example Ć is U+0106 and ż is U+017C. So my original post was incomplete; after casting the char to an int you would then have to format the int as a hexadecimal string using Integer.parseInt(xxx, 16).




[EDIT: When I switched my IDE's encoding from "System default" to UTF-8, I got an "umappable character for UTF-8" error. So, yeah, encoding has something to do with it. Not sure exactly what the OP needs to do though.]


Eh? What do hex Strings have to do with it? I figured your original post was straightforward and correct, so I was surprised when the OP said it didn't work. I tried the following, and got surprising results. So there must be something with locale or encoding that we're missing, yes?

The question marks don't surprise me--I figure my console just doesn't have the right encoding and/or font. But the 63s do surprise me. The String shows up correclty (at least I assume it's correct) in my browser here and in the String s = line in my source code, and yet ... ???

 
Jeff Verdegan
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@Sandy: I guess the first question is: Where are those characters coming from (hardcoded in .java source? reading from text file?) and what encoding are they in?
 
Paul Clapham
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Jeff Verdegan wrote:The question marks don't surprise me--I figure my console just doesn't have the right encoding and/or font. But the 63s do surprise me. The String shows up correclty (at least I assume it's correct) in my browser here and in the String s = line in my source code, and yet ... ???



You'll notice that only characters in the Western European character set (Ó and ó) are represented correctly. The others are apparently forced through a Western European encoding, which represents them as question marks. I ran that code on my machine and got this:

ĄĆĘŁŃÓŚŹŻąćęłńóśźż
Ą : 260
Ć : 262
Ę : 280
Ł : 321
Ń : 323
Ó : 211
Ś : 346
Ź : 377
Ż : 379
ą : 261
ć : 263
ę : 281
ł : 322
ń : 324
ó : 243
ś : 347
ź : 378
ż : 380

which apart from converting those numbers to hex is exactly what sandy wanted. Note that in my Eclipse-ish IDE the text file encoding is UTF-8.
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Paul Clapham wrote:
You'll notice that only characters in the Western European character set (Ó and ó) are represented correctly.



No, I didn't notice that, because I have no idea which of those characters are or are not in that character set.

The others are apparently forced through a Western European encoding, which represents them as question marks. I ran that code on my machine and got this:

ĄĆĘŁŃÓŚŹŻąćęłńóśźż
Ą : 260
Ć : 262
[snip]
which apart from converting those numbers to hex is exactly what sandy wanted. Note that in my Eclipse-ish IDE the text file encoding is UTF-8.



I'm using IntelliJ, and as far as I can tell I'm set to UTF-8. Copies pasted the text from the OP, and got the "invalid UTF-8 char mapping" or somesuch error.

Tried again just now, copying from the first line of your output here, and it worked fine.
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Jeff Verdegan wrote:@Sandy: I guess the first question is: Where are those characters coming from (hardcoded in .java source? reading from text file?) and what encoding are they in?



A better question might be: What encoding are you using for your IDE or editor? (Assuming this text is hardcoded.)
 
Paul Clapham
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Paul Clapham wrote:...after casting the char to an int you would then have to format the int as a hexadecimal string using Integer.parseInt(xxx, 16).



Actually, Integer.toHexString(xxx).
 
Jeff Verdegan
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This works for me. Not sure why it didn't like the encoding for me earlier:


 
Paul Clapham
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Jeff Verdegan wrote:This works for me... System.out.printf("%s: %04X%n", c, i)...



Yes, System.out.printf is better because then we don't have to deal with the question about how to get the leading zeroes. I always forget about printf (my excuse is I was never a C programmer).
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Jeff Verdegan wrote:This works for me... System.out.printf("%s: %04X%n", c, i)...



Yes, System.out.printf is better because then we don't have to deal with the question about how to get the leading zeroes. I always forget about printf (my excuse is I was never a C programmer).



Well, OP didn't seem to care about leading zeroes either. That was just me being Felix Unger-ish.
 
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Paul Clapham wrote:Yes, System.out.printf is better because then we don't have to deal with the question about how to get the leading zeroes. I always forget about printf (my excuse is I was never a C programmer).


And Java's has the wonderful "%n" as well

Winston
 
Paul Clapham
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Jeff Verdegan wrote:Well, OP didn't seem to care about leading zeroes either. That was just me being Felix Unger-ish.



He/she might have cared:

Ouput shud be - 104 106 118 141 143 0D3 15A 179 17B 105 107 119 142 144 0F3 15B 17A 17C

 
Jeff Verdegan
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Paul Clapham wrote:

Jeff Verdegan wrote:Well, OP didn't seem to care about leading zeroes either. That was just me being Felix Unger-ish.



He/she might have cared:

Ouput shud be - 104 106 118 141 143 0D3 15A 179 17B 105 107 119 142 144 0F3 15B 17A 17C



Ah. Didn't notice those. Just saw a bunch of 3-digit-ers. Never occurred to me someone might want exactly 3 hex digits. :)
 
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