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using IDE (Eclipse) or JDK for developing large Java projects  RSS feed

 
Marius Constantin
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My dear Experts,

What is the best approach for developing large Java projects : using an IDE like Eclipse or sticking to the JDK tools ?

I know that this question fits in the what-ever-works-for-you answer category, but I would very much appreciate a detailed answer to my noob question. Why the IDE is the best approach against the jdk and vice versa.

Thank you so so much for your time and effort.

Kind regards,
marius
 
Marius Constantin
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Hello again,

After reading some other posts based on my question, I can see that rangers here suggested that for a noob it is important to write as much code as possible, as many IDE's write a lot of the code themselves.

However, when do you actually know when it's the right time to move to an IDE ?

Although I don't know how to build classes, and access modifiers rules, so my projects are not so complex, I did my first project which is divided into 3 files and I feel the need for a debugger to debug my application, as the code will become more and more complex spreaded out into multiple files.

Please advice !

Kind regards,
marius
 
Jesper de Jong
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The reason that many people will tell you to start with just a text editor and the command line when you're a beginner is that you already have enough to learn, if you're starting from scratch. IDEs are powerful, but not always easy to use and understand for a beginner. It can become overwhelming if you have to learn a brand new programming language and an IDE at the same time, so it's better to keep it simple and start learning the programming language first, before you dive into learning how the IDE works.

For any serious, large project an IDE will be indispensable. It makes you much more productive - for example auto-complete means you'll have to type a lot less, it can automatically organize imports for you, it immediately shows you when you make an error so that you can fix it immediately (not necessary to compile the whole project), it can automatically format your code, it can automatically generate getters, setters, equals() and hashCode() methods for you, it has tools to help you refactor your code, it integrates with version control systems, it has an integrated debugger and much more.
 
Marius Constantin
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Jesper de Jong wrote:The reason that many people will tell you to start with just a text editor and the command line when you're a beginner is that you already have enough to learn, if you're starting from scratch. IDEs are powerful, but not always easy to use and understand for a beginner. It can become overwhelming if you have to learn a brand new programming language and an IDE at the same time, so it's better to keep it simple and start learning the programming language first, before you dive into learning how the IDE works.

For any serious, large project an IDE will be indispensable. It makes you much more productive - for example auto-complete means you'll have to type a lot less, it can automatically organize imports for you, it immediately shows you when you make an error so that you can fix it immediately (not necessary to compile the whole project), it can automatically format your code, it can automatically generate getters, setters, equals() and hashCode() methods for you, it has tools to help you refactor your code, it integrates with version control systems, it has an integrated debugger and much more.


Thank you so much Jesper !

However if I feel the need for a debugger now, when I am still learning the basics, but I know other languages too like C C++ Ruby VBA, should it be better to install Eclipse and use it's debugger or stick to jdb form the jdk ?

Thank you so much !
marius
 
Jeff Verdegan
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Marius Constantin wrote:

However if I feel the need for a debugger now, when I am still learning the basics, but I know other languages too like C C++ Ruby VBA, should it be better to install Eclipse and use it's debugger or stick to jdb form the jdk ?

Thank you so much !
marius


As long as you have a reasonable understanding of the fundamentals of Java and you're aware of the potential problems an IDE can cause for a beginner, and as long as you're able to realize the distinction between the language, the API, and the IDE, it shouldn't be any problem.

It's primarily absolute beginners who have never programmed before, who have never had to understand a command line compiler's output, and who think that NetBeans is Java, who need to steer clear for a while.
 
Marius Constantin
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Jeff Verdegan wrote:

As long as you have a reasonable understanding of the fundamentals of Java and you're aware of the potential problems an IDE can cause for a beginner, and as long as you're able to realize the distinction between the language, the API, and the IDE, it shouldn't be any problem.

It's primarily absolute beginners who have never programmed before, who have never had to understand a command line compiler's output, and who think that NetBeans is Java, who need to steer clear for a while.


Thank you Jeff, it's been of help !

kind regards
 
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