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login using x509 certificates

 
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Excuse my ignorance but what is :

"remote user SSO implementation" :?:

Hugs,
Tarrinho
[originally posted on jforum.net by tarrinho]
 
Migrated From Jforum.net
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helo,

I would like to know if the jforum has the functionality of permitting the login using x509 certificates, instead of username/password.

Thanks.
Tarrinho
[originally posted on jforum.net by tarrinho]
 
Migrated From Jforum.net
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There is no built in support for this.

The easiest way to do this might be to front end Jforum with a Web server that supports this (IIS or (I think) Apache) and then use the remote user SSO implementation.

Alternatively, you can write your own SSO implimentation to do this.
[originally posted on jforum.net by monroe]
 
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I take he was thinking of the default SSO implementation that is given as example within jforum - namely "RemoteUserSSO" - which simply asks if there is a remoteUser set in the request.

You can write any own implementation too, to validate that a user has been signed on within the surrounding applications ... and if the session is still valid. After you did, modify the settings within systemglobals.conf or preferably jforum-custom.conf and correct the sso-implementation entry, now pointing to the new sso file you just may have created ...

The documentations for sso probably are still somewhat out of date ^^

But it's actually quite easy to understand once you look at the source files
[originally posted on jforum.net by Sid]
 
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