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Hurra i'm normal!
Brussels sprouts do taste awful but mutants cant taste it.
Finally justice after all those years
 
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Sheesh... the lengths that scientists will go just to rationalize the hatred of vegetables...

Henry
 
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I love all vegetables. That is, except for Brussels sprouts and eggplant. The former tastes like sucking on a dirty penny to me, and the latter tastes like what I'd expect used gym socks left in the bottom of the bag for a month to taste like.

For the record, I'm very fond of other divisive vegetable such as lima beans, asparagus and cilantro.

 
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I find that cilantro tastes like soap when I eat it, but I still eat it if I find it in my food.
 
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Are these real vegetables? I mean are those from planet earth?

I've never heard any of these names before (except Brussels - that is a city I guess)
 
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I suspect you've encountered cilantro before. It's that green stuff that grows from coriander seeds.

Lima is a city too, by the way.
 
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Mike Simmons wrote:I suspect you've encountered cilantro before. It's that green stuff that grows from coriander seeds.


Ah, didn't know that. We just call it "coriander". Unless there's some subtle distinction?
 
Mike Simmons
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"Cilantro" is the Spanish word for coriander. Because the greens are used a lot in Mexican cuisine, which is popular in the US, that's how the greens are usually labeled in stores here. Meanwhile the seeds continue to be known as coriander.
 
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There are a number of cases where American English (at least in California) uses a Spanish influenced word for a kind of produce in place of the British English word.

As far as I know:

cilantro = (fresh) coriander
alfalfa = lucerne
arugula = rocket
jicama = pachyrhizus
papaya = pawpaw or papaw

Do I have those right?
 
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Greg Charles wrote:There are a number of cases where American English (at least in California) uses a Spanish influenced word for a kind of produce in place of the British English word.

As far as I know:

cilantro = (fresh) coriander
alfalfa = lucerne
arugula = rocket
jicama = pachyrhizus
papaya = pawpaw or papaw

Do I have those right?



Just to add a data point...

Here in Ohio, I'd use all the California terms. That includes using "cilantro" for the leaves and "coriander" for the seeds.

To be honest, I've never heard of lucern as the name of a plant or pachyrhizus. However, I've known (and subsequently forgotten until now) the arugula/rocket and papaya/pawpaw pairs.

 
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Those terms are definitely not limited to CA.
 
Paul Clapham
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Greg Charles wrote:There are a number of cases where American English (at least in California) uses a Spanish influenced word for a kind of produce in place of the British English word.



And then there's zucchini (American, from Italian) versus courgette (British, from French).
 
Paul Clapham
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Mike Simmons wrote:"Cilantro" is the Spanish word for coriander. Because the greens are used a lot in Mexican cuisine, which is popular in the US, that's how the greens are usually labeled in stores here. Meanwhile the seeds continue to be known as coriander.



And the Spanish derived "cilantro" from the Latin word "coriandrum", just to complete the circle.
 
Paul Clapham
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Bear Bibeault wrote:used gym socks left in the bottom of the bag for a month



I believe in the world of cheeses, this is a feature rather than a bug.
 
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I too am a fan of "stinky" cheeses. Eggplant is not in the same category. A lot of people describe it as bitter -- but that's not what I taste. To me it leaves a dirty, moldy, rotten cotton aftertaste -- really nasty.
 
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