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Spring in Action and other books

 
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Hello Authors,

You know that there are many books about Spring and the Spring Reference Documentation that is a good resource.

In your opinion, what is the main caracteristic that makes the Spring in Action better than the other books?

Thanks a lot!
 
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Originally posted by Regis Santos:
In your opinion, what is the main caracteristic that makes the Spring in Action better than the other books?



I want to be careful answering this question because the other Spring books are good and I don't want to give the impression that I'm dismissing them as worthless. At the same time, I want our book to appear to be the best.

Our book provides a near-comprehensive coverage of Spring, but does so focusing on (what we believe are) the most commonly used features. It's fun to read and has some interesting examples.

Admittedly, it does cover a lot of the same ground as the other books, but I believe it covers the topic in a way that is easier to digest. It's not quite as pragmatic as I had hoped it would be, but it's far from being a reference manual.

In considering the other Spring books out there, I found some to be too simplistic, only skimming the topics presented. In other cases, the books are too in-depth, going into detail that is not of interest to most readers. I believe our book fits somewhere in the middle.

Beyond that, I can't provide any more insight without picking on details and naming names (and I refuse to go there).
 
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I already bought the online version of the book. I haven't read any other books on Spring but I will say that compared to all the other In Action books I own. Spring In Action is by far the most complete with regards to learning the technology. A much better mix of how Spring works and How to use Spring. Most of the other In Action books I have focus way to much on the In Depth chapters and forget to show you how to use it with code examples.
 
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This is my opinion. It is okay to differ with others I guess.

I have Rod Johnson's J2EE without EJB book
I looked at the table of contents of this book too - Spring in Action.

I seem to be liking Spring in Action...
Rod's book is great. But half the book tends to cover the same musings of his first book.

This book (Spring in Action) looks to be crispy and covers lot of ground
Again just my opinion.
[ April 15, 2005: Message edited by: Srikanth Shenoy ]
 
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