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Why would one like to do a Cert in an IDE

 
Chrispie Smith
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Maybe this is similar as other question of "is the Cert worth it".

Don't get me wrong. I don’t think that anything you learn from an editor is not worth any value. I do believe there is 100’s of things that I myself just don’t know about the editors that I use (@work MyEclipse and @home I use Netbeans frt JavaFx-Some really nice integration)

But what I would like to know what value will I get from a Cert. as appose to just learn it for myself. Will it be of any value on a CV?
 
Robert James Liguori
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Chrispie Smith wrote:Maybe this is similar as other question of "is the Cert worth it".

Don't get me wrong. I don’t think that anything you learn from an editor is not worth any value. I do believe there is 100’s of things that I myself just don’t know about the editors that I use (@work MyEclipse and @home I use Netbeans frt JavaFx-Some really nice integration)

But what I would like to know what value will I get from a Cert. as appose to just learn it for myself. Will it be of any value on a CV?


I think that the OCAP (e.g. SCJP) would stand out best on a CV/resume. The NetBeans cert would bring value, but really isn't looked for by employers.

I would say that it's true that you could have a fulfilling career in software development without knowing all of the cool and useful features that an IDE can do for you. However, I feel bad for people (for example) who hand crank getter and setter methods only to find out years later that they could have generated this code (accessors and mutators) in a couple of clicks with the IDE.

Thanks for the question.

-- Robert
 
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