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Which book to learn Spring?

 
Greenhorn
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Hello,

Which book should I read to learn the Spring framework? My main concern is how to use spring as an alternative to stateful and stateless session beans and its support for the Core J2EE patterns in the middle tier. It is important for me that the book discusses how spring fit in the whole picture of an enterprise J2EE application as well as its integration with other frameworks such as JSF and Hibernate.
 
Ranch Hand
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Pro Spring......
 
Steven Dolan
Greenhorn
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Pro Spring......

--------------------


Does it cover all the points above?
 
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I agree, Pro Spring is a very good book for learning Spring. I don't think it covers anything about JSF though.

You can have a look at the TOC to see whats in it.
 
author
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If you want to learn Spring, I might suggest "Spring in Action".
If you already know something about Spring and would like to get a thorough reference for Spring, then I might suggest "Pro Spring".
All in all, they're both great books and you won't go wrong with either of them.
 
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Originally posted by Lasse Koskela:
If you want to learn Spring, I might suggest "Spring in Action".
If you already know something about Spring and would like to get a thorough reference for Spring, then I might suggest "Pro Spring".
All in all, they're both great books and you won't go wrong with either of them.



+1. I have them both and reference both of them for different things.
 
author
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Spring Live has JSF coverage. ;-)
 
Greenhorn
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Rod Johnson - Developing J2EE without EJB

It covers how Spring fits in enterprise applications and what it's benefits are over EJB and when you should use EJB instead of some lightweight container.
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Originally posted by Thomas Becker:
...when you should use EJB instead of some lightweight container.



Which is NEVER!!
 
Thomas Becker
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I totally agree in 90% of the cases. Maybe even 95%.
 
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I am an experienced Spring user and have Spring Live and Pro Spring which are both good. I highly recommend the new "Professional Java Development with the Spring Framework" by Rod Johnson, Juergen Hoeller, Alef Arendsen, Thomas Risberg, and Colin Sampaleanu. This group is most of the core of the Spring development team. The book does a good job of covering the strategic aspects of using Spring as well as the basic details of how-to use it.
 
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Originally posted by Thomas Becker:
Rod Johnson - Developing J2EE without EJB

It covers how Spring fits in enterprise applications and what it's benefits are over EJB and when you should use EJB instead of some lightweight container.



From a learning perspective, Rod's above mentioned book is ok. But don't bet on going beyond certain basics. I felt it was boring after half the book, since there was a lot of repetition.

"pro spring', 'Spring in Action' will definitely give a head start on this technology.
 
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