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What to do when current job offers no learning?

 
Greenhorn
Posts: 8
Java
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Hi everybody,

I recently joined this forum and very glad to this after reading many knowledgeable threads.I am currently working in an MNC with Java/J2EE technology ina support project for past 2 yrs.Due to less workload and large team size,i found myself not upto to the current market requirements.I worked in Core Java,JSP,Servlets,Struts etc but i think i have not learned enough to switch to some other company.Please guide me what to do in this scenario.Should i leave the project ot should i start learning Java/J2EE by books to get enough theretical knowledge.
 
Bartender
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Eclipse IDE Java Linux
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Welcome to CodeRanch!

One good thing I see here is - less workload.

So, this is the best time for you to learn new things, sharpen the skills, and get industry-ready.

And once you feel comfortable with those technologies, you can put that knowledge to work (e.g. creating internal tools and sharing those with team etc.).

Then you can also look for another project in same company, or switch the job altogether. However, I would emphasise to be good at skills you want to work in.

I hope this helps.

All the best!
 
Ranch Hand
Posts: 463
Eclipse IDE Tomcat Server Java
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Did you considered Java certifications? They're good way to learn dungeons deep of knowledge and they look good on resume. Good luck!
 
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