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Version Control with Eclipse

 
Terry Bailey
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Hi everyone!

Does anyone have any thoughts on the best **free** version control that I can use with Eclipse.

I need basic check in/out and a way to track changes through versions. Other than that I'm looking for ease of use and maintenance above all.

Any ideas greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Terry
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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Have you installed a version control first?

If yes you can install corresponding eclipse-plugin to enable check-in check-out from/within eclipse.
 
Akhilesh Trivedi
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You may be interested in this thread :

http://www.coderanch.com/t/481031/vc/Tortoise-SVN-eclipse-plugin
 
Terry Bailey
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Thanks Akhilesh.

So it seems nothings moved since 2008... Shame that
 
Martin Vajsar
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Based on you requirements, I would recommend a distributed version control system (such as Git or Mercurial). You don't need to run any version control server and you can easily back up the entire repository just by copying its files. Both of these systems have plugins for Eclipse.

I use NetBeans and Mercurial myself, and though they are integrated nicely, I use TortoiseHg (the Mercurial visual client) almost exclusively for managing the sources. Moreover, I was using CVS before, and with Mercurial I feel much more confident about the code base (it's hard to describe, but if you're interested, I can try to expand on this).
 
Terry Bailey
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Thanks Martin, I'll have a look at those to see if they fit in with what I need.

Regards,
Terry.
 
Marcos Vidolin
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Hi,

Git is a great idea. All of the most popular open source projects has acceded Git like: jQuery, RichFaces, Rails, SpringFramework... - see https://github.com/popular/forked.
This is the Eclipse plugin that I use: EGit http://www.eclipse.org/egit/

[]'s
 
Tim Holloway
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"Best" is a word that makes me grit my teeth. It asserts that There Can Be Only One.

Git is very popular these days. It has the advantage that you can work completely offline.

Subversion is one of the most popular VCSs, although you do have to install one of the Subversion plugins to use it with Eclipse (which is also true for Git).

CVS support is built into Eclipse, although few use CVS any more because it doesn't handle empty directories or file/directory rename operations very well.

Mercurial is what the Xen virtual machine development team favors (among other famous people).

There are many more free VCS's. The Wikipedia is good for tables of stuff like that. Once you've narrowed down a list of candidates, you can search the Eclipse plugin sites to see if there's a corresponding Eclipse plugin to support it.
 
Pat Farrell
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Tim Holloway wrote:"Best" is a word that makes me grit my teeth. It asserts that There Can Be Only One.

Git is very popular these days. It has the advantage that you can work completely offline.

Subversion is one of the most popular VCSs, although you do have to install one of the Subversion plugins to use it with Eclipse (which is also true for Git).


I used CVS for years, then moved to subversion, and am now using git.

In my usage, both CVS and subversion did all the easy stuff well, but their approach to merging (when two developers change the same code in different ways) gets painful quickly. Using git, the merge process is much easier.

But, and this is a big but, git is extremely powerful. It was designed and built by extreme geeks (Linus himself) to meet the needs of power geeks. While the documentation is complete, it assumes that you understand what power geeks want to do. So its got a bit of a learning curve, and its more than a bit steep in places.
 
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