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Getting started?

 
Jayson Hayes
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Good Afternoon,
I have recently been contemplating whether or not to begin writing code again. Its been about 8 years since i have done anything related to this. I was pretty decent at HTML back in the day, but after taking a few IT class' i just lost interest in the whole computer scene. Well, I'm back at it. Here is my question. I understand everyone is different, but when it comes to starting to learn a language i want to be diverse. I know C++ is a common language. Before learning how to write the code, is there anything i should fill my cranium with before hand? I know i will not be learning this overnight, or even in the first year. I am certain this is what i want to do, i like the challenge that comes with it, its fascinating to me. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thank you J. Hayes
 
Tony Jaa
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Jayson Hayes wrote:Good Afternoon,
I have recently been contemplating whether or not to begin writing code again. Its been about 8 years since i have done anything related to this. I was pretty decent at HTML back in the day, but after taking a few IT class' i just lost interest in the whole computer scene. Well, I'm back at it. Here is my question. I understand everyone is different, but when it comes to starting to learn a language i want to be diverse. I know C++ is a common language. Before learning how to write the code, is there anything i should fill my cranium with before hand? I know i will not be learning this overnight, or even in the first year. I am certain this is what i want to do, i like the challenge that comes with it, its fascinating to me. Any words of wisdom would be greatly appreciated. Thank you J. Hayes


Why did you lose interest in the "computer scene" ? The answer to that question might answer your question. I suggest that you take courses at a good local college and/or courses at udemy. There is a lot you need to learn to become a good developer. Computer architecture, Networks, Operating systems, Databases etc. If you don't learn these (in the proper sequence) and just chase a language or two, then you will be at a big disadvantage. Avoid certifications unless your employer requires them. They don't really make a difference to your resume. Of all the job ads and interviews I have seen, certifications have no value and are not even mentioned once.

I believe that the moment an interviewee tries to "sell himself" using his ocjp cert, I would become skeptical about him. If he has what it takes, then he would show me some experience instead.
Read a book like head first java to decide if you are interested in this.

just my 2 cents.
 
Bear Bibeault
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What's your goal? Program as a hobby? or get a job?

If the latter, before choosing C++ (or Java, or other) see what's in demand in your area. C++ is still a popular language, but not a whole lot of jobs in my area (Austin).
 
Jayson Hayes
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Thanks to both of you. I live in Northern Michigan, I would be required to move if i was looking for work. My whole plan here is to find out what I like, what I am good at, and where I can be most productive. Ill take both of yours advise, and go take a look at getting in some class'. I guess it would be a good idea to start learning a little IT first off. We all know of Cisco, is that worth face value?
 
Paul Mrozik
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Tony Jaa wrote:
I believe that the moment an interviewee tries to "sell himself" using his ocjp cert, I would become skeptical about him. If he has what it takes, then he would show me some experience instead.
Read a book like head first java to decide if you are interested in this.

just my 2 cents.


An OCJP certificate is just that, a certificate. It may not be worth much, but personally it gives me a goal to work toward and while studying for it, and one can find what their weak points are. You won't become a developer (marathon runner, putwhateverelseyouwanthere, etc.) overnight, but you have to start somewhere.

Just out of curiosity, have you ever or do you personally employ anyone for a Java developer position?
 
Tony Jaa
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Paul Mrozik wrote:
Just out of curiosity, have you ever or do you personally employ anyone for a Java developer position?


Well actually, I am not in that position yet. I am a junior developer. In some of my interviews I mentioned the certificate and got a lukewarm response at best.
I got them interested only when I told them about some of my modest little projects. The only person who might be influenced by my cert is the HR dept. But
that is a may be.


 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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