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Spring & JTA

 
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Hi all,
Is my day for questions. I got landed with a web app project, and decided to use spring MVC.

I liked its "layered" approach so I could get teh app up and running and then worry about expaniding it out with things like Transactions, Security and perhaps using ORM.

However, if all I need to do in a single DB environment is:


If i am understanding this layered/modulor approach right, I shouldnt have to do too much to update my code to take advantage of another service (JTA in this case) but i have so far only seen the above entry in the jPetStore example, so I feel I am missing something, it cant be that easy.

G
 
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Hi,

I suppose that you'd like using declarative transactions (via AOP) with Spring. You may need then to read about the Spring transaction management here:

http://www.springframework.org/docs/reference/transaction.html

In a nutshell you need to define your transaction manager to be JTA compatible. If you�re using WAS it might look something like this:



For most of the app servers using only the JtaTransactionManager should be quite enough.

Now assuming you have a controller bean that uses a DAO (implemented using an ORM tool like Hibernate) that updates two different databases, which should happen within the same transaction:



The trick here is that you�ll map the requests to a proxy bean ( removeTransactionController), which will actually do the transaction management for you (Spring uses the cglib api in order to build this proxy bean at runtime):



If your app doesn�t use global transactions, then using the HibernateTransactionManager could be your best choice with spring-hibernate applications:



Basically this is how it works.
Regards.
 
Gavin Tranter
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Thanks for the detailed answer.

It sounds like I wont be needing JTA for my app then, as I only have one DB on one server to deal with.

G
 
Valentin Tanase
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You're very welcome Gavin.
 
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