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dan Ranity
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Please forgive me for asking this as i know its being asked but with new things being released for java and new books coming out its all very confusing. Now i have done some java before but i just want a book that will teach me and then give me like problems to figure out with the solutions etc. I have been told to get theses:
Java, A Beginner's Guide, 5th Edition by Herbert Schildt
Learning Java by Patrick Niemeyer
Sams Teach Yourself Java 2 in 21 Days
Which do you recommended? Or is there any other books which are better then these two. Again sorry if this has been asked like millions of times
 
Jeff Verdegan
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I very, very, strongly recommend avoiding any book that purports to teach you Java (or anything) in "21 days" or some other similar ridiculous short time. (See Nordvig's thoughts on the matter for why.)

Other than that, please SearchFirst(⇐click).
 
dan Ranity
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Thanks i looked and iam going go and get Java, A Beginner's Guide, 5th Edition by Herbert Schildt . Thanks again for the help
 
Mack Wilmot
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I think Sam's Teach Yourself Java in 21 days is a great book for a beginner. If you can learn everything there is to know about Java from one book, let me know which one it is because I have read many.

The Herbert Schildt book is fine too.
 
Rameshwar Soni
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1) beginner

2) beginner

3) Some more

4) and more

5) After head first java
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Mack Wilmot wrote:I think Sam's Teach Yourself Java in 21 days is a great book for a beginner. . . . .
Unless it has changed radically since my old copy was printed, I disagree. I do not think it is a good book at all.
 
David Blaine
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dan Ranity wrote:Please forgive me for asking this as i know its being asked but with new things being released for java and new books coming out its all very confusing. Now i have done some java before but i just want a book that will teach me and then give me like problems to figure out with the solutions etc. I have been told to get theses:
Java, A Beginner's Guide, 5th Edition by Herbert Schildt
Learning Java by Patrick Niemeyer
Sams Teach Yourself Java 2 in 21 Days
Which do you recommended? Or is there any other books which are better then these two. Again sorry if this has been asked like millions of times


Sams Teach Yourself Java 2 in 21 Days - NO^1million. Good for superficial learning only.
Java, A Beginner's Guide, 5th Edition by Herbert Schildt - dry, dull and manual like.
Learning Java by Patrick Niemeyer - Never heard of it. See amazon reviews. Not that great.

Have you programmed before (not HTML)

Go to amazon and check out these books. I am 99% confident that the book you choose in the end will be one of these -

Head first Java (funny n cool)
Absolute Java (spoon feed a LOT)
Java How to Program (spoon feed a little and teach many nice things)
Thinking in Java (If you programmed in other languages)
Big Java (If you programmed in other languages, teach many nice things)

Pick a book quickly and solve a lot of problems. Easiest way to get good. Don't get too drowned in theory and such.
 
David Blaine
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Campbell Ritchie
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It is worth reading a chapter on the Amazon website before you buy the book. A lot depends on the authors’ style and how you interact with it.
 
Mack Wilmot
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Sams Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days gets to the point and you move on, very nice. Yep, superficial learning if you want to call it that, I don't. That is good for a beginner who doesn't need to be hit with the details and depths of everything. Then when you get a good overview of everything, you pick up thicker books and delve into more details. Very good way to learn for many.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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My copy of SAMS Teach Yourself … teaches dubious programming, using the main method almost exclusively and not introducing objects until hundreds of pages have passed. If you want to learn syntax but not know what object‑oriented programming is all about, that is the book for you

Yes, I know a lot of other books fall into the same trap. Even the Java Tutorials use the main method extensively.
 
Mack Wilmot
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Most books won't cover Generics well enough for you to get a good grasp of them at all, especially beginners books.
 
Supun Lakshan Dissanayake
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try head first java
 
David Blaine
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Mack Wilmot wrote:Most books won't cover Generics well enough for you to get a good grasp of them at all, especially beginners books.


I agree. I have experienced the same thing. Can you suggest some books/websites which cover generics in great depth and also with a lot of examples and test questions ?
 
Mack Wilmot
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David Blaine wrote:
Mack Wilmot wrote:Most books won't cover Generics well enough for you to get a good grasp of them at all, especially beginners books.


I agree. I have experienced the same thing. Can you suggest some books/websites which cover generics in great depth and also with a lot of examples and test questions ?



Read all of these 2 or 3 times and you can get a grasp of it. The first 2 reference spend a lot of time telling you why you can't do something and examples of why it doesn't work instead of sticking to what does work. That gets very weighty.

O'reilly - Java Generics and Collections
http://www.angelikalanger.com/GenericsFAQ/JavaGenericsFAQ.html
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/index.html

Understanding what is and what isn't a supertype of a Generic type is difficult. Understanding how to use bounded wildcard reference types is difficult. Understanding the differences between a wildcard and a multi-level wildcard reference is difficult.
 
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