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where to go after struts...?

 
azhar bharat
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Hi
I have fairly good experience with struts. But thinking of looking beyond struts. Because from what I have read, new projects involving struts have gone down. The problem is where to move from here. There are a lot of frameworks, I cant even remember how many, let alone remember their name. However I feel JSF is really promising.

What opinion do you guys have about moving to jsf and should this be my first step outside struts?

What is with this shale? it seems to be linked to struts, jsf, webwork... what is it really?

Is there any shortcoming in jsf compared to struts?
 
Jimmy Clark
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Learning how to use Hibernate would be good. Spring also would be good. However, the best step, in my opinion, would be to learn how to program Composite applications with the Java Business Integration architecture.

http://java.sun.com/integration/
 
azhar bharat
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Originally posted by James Clark:
Learning how to use Hibernate would be good. Spring also would be good. However, the best step, in my opinion, would be to learn how to program Composite applications with the Java Business Integration architecture.

http://java.sun.com/integration/


hey thanks james,
but i was looking more in the context of mvc frameworks like jsf, shale etc..
 
Marc Peabody
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Grails is awesome if you're willing to learn a little Groovy.
 
Eelco Hillenius
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Originally posted by azhar bharat:

What opinion do you guys have about moving to jsf and should this be my first step outside struts?


I think JSF is an improvement over Struts, and if you care about job prospects as a Java programmer it would be a good framework to learn. It's also somewhat similar to ASP.NET.

Originally posted by azhar bharat:

Is there any shortcoming in jsf compared to struts?


I think the other way around. Struts has shortcommings that JSF solves.

JSF is not a perfect framework though. Consider looking at GWT and (shameless plug) Wicket as well. Learning these frameworks can be a good thing for your OO skills.
 
azhar bharat
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Thanks for the replies.
Eelco Hillenius: If you dont mind, can you tell me in what ways it is similar to asp.net?
 
Gareth Baker
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Although I have not used jsf personally I think that there is one major benefit to using wicket as opposed to many other frameworks. What I like about wicket is its java + html and not java + html + java script hacks + templates + something else to make things "easier".
Also it appears that wicket jobs may be on the rise (although I suggest further research yourself): http://www.indeed.com/jobs?q=java+wicket+%2480%2C000
 
Eelco Hillenius
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Originally posted by azhar bharat:
Thanks for the replies.
Eelco Hillenius: If you dont mind, can you tell me in what ways it is similar to asp.net?


Well, I don't have extensive experience with JSF (read books and looked at example code mainly), and only worked for a few weeks on ASP.NET projects in the past, but I noticed that the they both have a 'view state' kind of construct, and both support serializing state to the client (quite un-useful in my experience for real world apps... one page had over an MB of state in it when we profiled it). With both frameworks, it seems to be general practice to configure components in markup (you'd state your validation constraints in your markup for instance). They are also both component oriented. Unfortunately creating your own components is quite a hassle with both.
 
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