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Hi, Eric. I haven't had a chance to see your book yet but thanks for writing it. The title suggests to me that you're treating javascript as an "ecosystem," like when we talk about "programming java applications," which assumes a stack of languages and tools. Do I have that right?

In other words, at the risk of getting a "damn, you're stupid" from a certain predatory mammal, what languages are the topic of your book?

(Ducking)
Rick
 
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I think that the JavaScript ecosystem has a lot less to do with languages than with libraries, frameworks and tools.

And as pointed out throughout this week, there's no dearth of them! In fact, quite the opposite. There are so many to choose from, with no clear leaders emerging yet (except jQuery, of course, which has almost become a platform).

The list is seemingly endless: jQuery, ExtJS, Ember, Backbone, AngularJS, Bootstrap, RequireJS, and on and on. Tools like yeoman (now "yo"), grunt, and bower. In-browser debuggers. And then there's the whole Node, Express and the rest of the server-side eco-system.

It's a very different ecosystem than those of us used to Java; but no less diverse.
 
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Rick Goff wrote:Hi, Eric. I haven't had a chance to see your book yet but thanks for writing it. The title suggests to me that you're treating javascript as an "ecosystem," like when we talk about "programming java applications," which assumes a stack of languages and tools. Do I have that right?

In other words, at the risk of getting a "damn, you're stupid" from a certain predatory mammal, what languages are the topic of your book?

(Ducking)
Rick



The book certainly touches on a variety of tools and libraries available to JavaScript programmers. See this post for a list of libraries covered. It does not discuss other languages in-depth. I assume the readers already know HTML and CSS, and I consider them out-of-scope for discussion in the book. I could hardly cover everything there is to know about developing applications on the web platform.

It also does not cover the many compile-to-JavaScript languages popping up. Nor does it discuss virtual machines that run in JavaScript.

That said, if you have some experience with related technologies, and some experience with JavaScript, you'll find plenty to digest in this book.

- Eric
 
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