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The Object-Oriented Thought Process (4th Edition) (Developer's Library)  RSS feed

 
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Author/s    : Matt Weisfeld
Publisher   : Addison-Wesley Professional
Category   : Beginning Java
Review by : Mohamed Sanaulla
Rating        : 8 horseshoes

If you were to ask me a book to understand the Object oriented concepts in a practical way- I will surely recommend "The Object Oriented Thought process".

These are some of the good things I found:
- the author tries to be independent of the programming language while explaining the concepts. You can see few Java examples to make things more clear, few C# examples and a mention of Objective C here and there.
- there has been use of UML class diagrams in a simple way and a dedicated chapter to understand UML class diagrams.
- in the first part of the book i.e upto around chapter 10 the code examples are fairly simple.
- some introduction to few advanced concepts in OOP like serialization, persistance, client-server, design patterns.
- the author tries to explain any new concepts right at the place where they were introduced.
- the author uses simple language to explain concepts.

These are some of the not so good things:
- the code examples in the application chapters are a bit overdose. They are a bit complicated for a newbie in Java, but the stress is not on the code but on the concepts.
- illustrations in few places were not required.
- code exmaples in XML chapters are not so clear and at few places the code is not indented correctly.

Bottom line is: Recommend this book to anyone who wants to get a good understanding of basic OOP concepts without much intervention of a programming language. Not much recommended to someone who's already been doing OOP development for quite sometime.

---
Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for writing this review on behalf of CodeRanch.

More info at Amazon.com
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