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query related to injection of simple environment entries

 
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from sectino 16.4.1.2 of ejb 3.1 specs consider given snippet of code



earlier the resources minEcemptinos and maxExceptions are declared as below :

@Resource
int minExceptions; // now in this case the jndi name will be defaulted i.e. java:comp/env/<fully qualified classname>/minExceptions

now when we will do jndi lookup insted of myEnv.lookup("maxExcemptions") should give an exception right ? we should use myEnv.lookup("<fullyqualifiedclassname>/minExcemptions . am i right or i am missing something ? Please help

Thanks
 
gurpeet singh
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i got this one few pages ahead.
 
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Just for the other readers it is nice to place the answer (as this topic can be quite difficult to grab)

Each env-entry deployment descriptor element describes a single environment entry. The env-entry element consists of an optional description of the environment entry, the environment entry name relative to the java:comp/env context, the expected Java type of the environment entry value (i.e., the type of the object returned from the EJBContext or JNDI lookup method), and an optional environment entry value.



So when it comes to the simple-environment-values their names (<env-entry-name>) will always be relative to the "java:comp/env".

Regards,
Frits
 
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